Tractatenblad van het Koninkrijk der Nederlanden

Datum publicatieOrganisatieJaargang en nummerRubriekDatum totstandkoming
Ministerie van Buitenlandse ZakenTractatenblad 2012, 180Verdrag

42 (1996) Nr. 4

A. TITEL

Overeenkomst inzake de bescherming van Afrikaans-Euraziatische trekkende watervogels;

(met Bijlagen)

’s-Gravenhage, 15 augustus 1996

B. TEKST

De Engelse en de Franse tekst van de Overeenkomst, met Bijlagen, zijn geplaatst in Trb. 1996, 285.

Zie voor correcties in de Franse tekst Trb. 2005, 25.

Voor de Engelse en de Franse tekst van het Besluit van 9 november 1999 tot wijziging van Bijlage 3 en zijn Tabel 1 bij de Overeenkomst, zie Trb. 2005, 25.

Voor de Engelse en de Franse tekst van het Besluit van 27 september 2002 tot wijziging van Bijlage 2 en Tabel 1 van Bijlage 3 bij de Overeenkomst, zie eveneens Trb. 2005, 25.

Voor de Engelse en Franse tekst van het Besluit van 19 september 2008 tot wijziging van Bijlagen 2 en 3 en zijn Tabel 1 bij de Overeenkomst, zie Trb. 2009, 47.

Tijdens de vijfde zitting van de Vergadering der partijen, die van 14 tot 18 mei 2012 plaatsvond in La Rochelle, werd een Besluit tot wijziging van Bijlagen 2 en 3 en zijn Tabel 1 bij de Overeenkomst aangenomen. De Engelse en de Franse tekst van het Besluit van 18 mei 2012 en de gewijzigde Bijlagen 2 en 3 en zijn Tabel 1 luiden als volgt:

Resolution 5.6
Adoption Of Amendments To The Aewa Action Plan

Recalling Article X of the Agreement concerning the procedures for amendments to the Agreement and its annexes,

Further recalling Resolution 4.1 which, inter alia, requested the Technical Committee to examine, as far as waterbird species covered by the Agreement are concerned, any potential problems from the use of lead fishing weights,

Taking into account the recommendations of the Literature Review on effects of the use of lead fishing weights on waterbirds and wetlands, which was prepared by the Secretariat intersessionally, on request of the Technical Committee (document AEWA/MOP Inf. 5.2),

Recalling Resolution 4.3 which, inter alia, requested the Technical Committee to review and to provide guidance on the interpretation and implications of the Action Plan’s provisions related to hunting and trade as specified in Annex 1 to the same Resolution,

Recalling also Resolution 4.11 which, inter alia, requested the Technical Committee to review ornithological data on the Little Tern (Sterna albifrons) for a better delineation of the Mediterranean populations taking into account the relevant information concerning the Italian breeding population and to draft a consequent proposal for amendments to Table 1, as appropriate, to be presented to the 5th Session of the Meeting of the Parties; to review the definitions of geographical terms used in range descriptions of populations in Table 1 and to draft a consequent proposal for amendments to Table 1, as appropriate, to be presented to the 5th Session of the Meeting of the Parties; to review, in the light of the development of terminology used by IUCN for Red Data Lists, as a matter of priority, the applicability of the threat criteria, especially the Near Threatened IUCN Category, to the listing of populations in Table 1 and to present options for the amendment of Table 1 to be considered at the 5th Session of the Meeting of the Parties; and to draft a proposal for amendments to the AEWA Action Plan to deal with tackling the effects of aquatic invasive non-native species on waterbird habitats to be presented to the 5th Session of the Meeting of the Parties,

Further recalling Resolution 4.12 which, inter alia, requested the Technical Committee, using external assistance as necessary and appropriate, and resources permitting, to develop guidance for interpretation of the term “extreme fluctuations in population size or trend” used in Table 1 of the Action Plan,

Recognising the work of the Technical Committee over the past four years to address these requests,

Taking into account the findings of the fifth edition of the Report on the Conservation Status of Migratory Waterbirds in the Agreement Area (document AEWA/MOP 5.14),

Acknowledging the proposals for amendments to Annex 3 (Action Plan and Table 1) submitted by Kenya and the comments received from Contracting Parties concerning these proposals, all of which are presented in the Addendum Rev.1 to document AEWA/MOP 5.20,

Acknowledging the recent global Red Listing of the Eurasian Curlew (Numenius arquata), the Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) and the Velvet Scoter (Melanitta fusca) and noting the importance of considering the implications of this change in listings for MOP6.

The Meeting of the Parties:

  • 1. Decides to amend the Action Plan in Annex 3 to the Agreement as set out in the Appendices to this Resolution;

  • 2. Decides, in particular, to:

    • 2.1. amend the current paragraphs 2.1, 2.5, 3.3, 4.1 and 4.3 of the Action Plan with the text set out in Appendix I to this Resolution,

    • 2.2. replace the current Table 1 of the Action Plan and the associated explanatory text with the Table and explanatory text set out in Appendix II to this Resolution,

    • 2.3. amend the scientific name of the Lesser Flamingo to Phoeniconaias minor; the scientific name of the Terek Sandpiper to Xenus cinereus; and the scientific name of the Common Sandpiper to Actitis hypoleucos in Annex 2 to the Agreement;

  • 3. Requests the Secretariat to monitor the implementation of the amendments;

  • 4. Urges Contracting Parties to support coordinated monitoring, research and conservation actions, including adaptive management measures and to support the development of single species action plans for the Eurasian Curlew (Numenius arquata), the Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) and the Velvet Scoter (Melanitta fusca), with prioritisation of the Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) during the next inter-sessional period;

  • 5. Requests the Technical Committee to explore how these multi-species and regional-scale declines might be addressed through a combination of appropriate national and international measures;

  • 6. Requests the Technical Committee to develop simple guidance that will allow Contracting Parties to report back to MOP6 on national knowledge concerning lead fishing weights and waterbirds and the phasing out of lead.

Appendix I

Annex 3 Action Plan

[…]

  • 2. Species Conservation

    • 2.1 Legal measures

      • 2.1.1 Parties with populations listed in Column A of Table 1 shall provide protection to those populations listed in accordance with Article III, paragraph 2(a), of this Agreement. Such Parties shall in particular and subject to paragraph 2.1.3 below:

        • a) prohibit the taking of birds and eggs of those populations occurring in their territory;

        • b) prohibit deliberate disturbance in so far as such disturbance would be significant for the conservation of the population concerned; and

        • c) prohibit the possession or utilisation of, and trade in, birds or eggs of those populations which have been taken in contravention of the prohibitions laid down pursuant to subparagraph (a) above, as well as the possession or utilisation of, and trade in, any readily recognizable parts or derivatives of such birds and their eggs.

        By way of exception for those populations listed in Categories 2 and 3 in Column A and which are marked by an asterisk, and those populations listed in Category 4 in Column A, hunting may continue on a sustainable use basis1). This sustainable use shall be conducted within the framework of an international species action plan, through which Parties will endeavour to implement the principles of adaptive harvest management.2) Such use shall, as a minimum, be subject to the same legal measures as the taking of birds from populations listed in Column B of Table 1, as required in paragraph 2.1.2 below.

      • 2.1.2 Parties with populations listed in Table 1 shall regulate the taking of birds and eggs of all populations listed in Column B of Table 1. The object of such legal measures shall be to maintain or contribute to the restoration of those populations to a favourable conservation status and to ensure, on the basis of the best available knowledge of population dynamics, that any taking or other use is sustainable. Such legal measures, subject to paragraph 2.1.3 below, shall in particular:

        • a) prohibit the taking of birds belonging to the populations concerned during their various stages of reproduction and rearing and during their return to their breeding grounds if the taking has an unfavourable impact on the conservation status of the population concerned;

        • b) regulate the modes of taking, and in particular prohibit the use of all indiscriminate means of taking and the use of all means capable of causing mass destructions, as well as local disappearance of, or serious disturbance to, populations of a species, including:

          • snares,

          • limes,

          • hooks,

          • live birds which are blind or mutilated used as decoys,

          • tape recorders and other electronic devices,

          • electrocuting devices,

          • artificial light sources,

          • mirrors and other dazzling devices,

          • devices for illuminating targets,

          • sighting devices for night shooting comprising an electronic image magnifier or image converter,

          • explosives,

          • nets,

          • traps,

          • poison,

          • poisoned or anaesthetic baits,

          • semi-automatic or automatic weapons with a magazine capable of holding more than two rounds of ammunition,

          • hunting from aircraft, motor vehicles, or boats driven at a speed exceeding 5km p/h (18km p/h on the open sea).

          Parties may grant exemptions from the prohibitions laid down in paragraph 2.1.2 (b) to accommodate use for livelihood purposes, where sustainable;

        • c) establish limits on taking, where appropriate, and provide adequate controls to ensure that these limits are observed; and

        • d) prohibit the possession or utilisation of, and trade in, birds and eggs of the populations which have been taken in contravention of any prohibition laid down pursuant to the provisions of this paragraph, as well as the possession or utilization of, and trade in, any readily recognizable parts or derivatives of such birds and their eggs.

      • 2.1.3 Parties may grant exemptions to the prohibitions laid down in paragraphs 2.1.1 and 2.1.2, irrespective of the provisions of Article III, paragraph 5, of the Convention, where there is no other satisfactory solution, for the following purposes:

        • a) to prevent serious damage to crops, water and fisheries;

        • b) in the interests of air safety, public health and public safety, or for other imperative reasons of overriding public interest, including those of a social or economic nature and beneficial consequences of primary importance to the environment;

        • c) for the purpose of research and education, of re-establishment and for the breeding necessary for these purposes;

        • d) to permit under strictly supervised conditions, on a selective basis and to a limited extent, the taking and keeping or other judicious use of certain birds in small numbers; and

        • e) for the purpose of enhancing the propagation or survival of the populations concerned.

        Such exemptions shall be precise as to content and limited in space and time and shall not operate to the detriment of the populations listed in Table 1. Parties shall, as soon as possible, inform the Agreement secretariat of any exemptions granted pursuant to this provision.

      […]

    • 2.5 Introductions

      • 2.5.1 Parties shall prohibit the introduction into the environment of non-native species of animals and plants which may be detrimental to the populations listed in Table 1.

      • 2.5.2 Parties shall require the taking of appropriate precautions to avoid the accidental escape of captive animals belonging to non-native species, which may be detrimental to the populations listed in Table 1.

      • 2.5.3 Parties shall take measures to the extent feasible and appropriate, including taking, to ensure that when non-native species or hybrids thereof have already been introduced into their territory, those species or their hybrids do not pose a potential hazard to the populations listed in Table 1.

    […]

  • 3. Habitat Conservation

    • 3.3 Rehabilitation and Restoration

      Parties shall endeavour to rehabilitate or restore, where feasible and appropriate, areas which were previously important for the populations listed in Table 1, including areas that suffer degradation as a result of the impacts of factors such as climate change, hydrological change, agriculture, spread of aquatic invasive non-native species, natural succession, uncontrolled fires, unsustainable use, eutrophication and pollution.

    […]

  • 4. Management of Human Activities

    • 4.1 Hunting

      • 4.1.1 Parties shall cooperate to ensure that their hunting legislation implements the principle of sustainable use as envisaged in this Action Plan, taking into account the full geographical range of the waterbird populations concerned and their life history characteristics.

      • 4.1.2 The Agreement secretariat shall be kept informed by the Parties of their legislation relating to the hunting of populations listed in Table 1.

      • 4.1.3 Parties shall cooperate with a view to developing a reliable and harmonised system for the collection of harvest data in order to assess the annual harvest of populations listed in Table 1. They shall provide the Agreement secretariat with estimates of the total annual take for each population, when available.

      • 4.1.4 Parties shall endeavour to phase out the use of lead shot for hunting in wetlands as soon as possible in accordance with self-imposed and published timetables.

      • 4.1.5.

      • 4.1.6 Parties shall develop and implement measures to reduce, and as far as possible eliminate, illegal taking.

      • 4.1.7 Where appropriate, Parties shall encourage hunters, at local, national and international levels, to form clubs or organisations to coordinate their activities and to help ensure sustainability.

      • 4.1.8 Parties shall, where appropriate, promote the requirement of a proficiency test for hunters, including among other things, bird identification.

    […]

    • 4.3 Other Human Activities

      [...]

      • 4.3.4 Parties shall cooperate with a view to developing single species management plans for populations which cause significant damage, in particular to crops and to fisheries. The Agreement secretariat shall coordinate the development and harmonization of such plans.

      [...]

      • 4.3.12 Parties, the Agreement secretariat and the Technical Committee will, as appropriate, work together to provide further documentation on the nature and scale of the effects of lead fishing weights on waterbirds and to consider that documentation, noting that lead in general poses a threat to the environment with harmful effects on waterbirds. Parties will, as appropriate, seek alternatives to lead fishing weights, taking into consideration the impact on waterbirds and water quality.

Appendix II

Table 11) Status of the populations of migratory waterbirds

Key to classification

The following key to Table 1 is a basis for implementation of the Action Plan:

Column A

Category 1:

  • a) Species, which are included in Appendix I to the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory species of Wild Animals;

  • b) Species, which are listed as threatened on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, as reported in the most recent summary by BirdLife International; or

  • c) Populations, which number less than around 10,000 individuals.

Category 2: Populations numbering between around 10,000 and around 25,000 individuals.

Category 3: Populations numbering between around 25,000 and around 100,000 individuals and considered to be at risk as a result of:

  • a) Concentration onto a small number of sites at any stage of their annual cycle;

  • b) Dependence on a habitat type, which is under severe threat;

  • c) Showing significant long-term decline; or

  • d) Showing large fluctuations in population size or trend.

Category 4: Species, which are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List of Threatened species, as reported in the most recent summary by BirdLife International, but do not fulfil the conditions in respect of Category 1, 2 or 3, as described above, and which are pertinent for international action.

For species listed in Categories 2, 3 and 4 above, see paragraph 2.1.1 of the Action Plan contained in Annex 3 to the Agreement.

Column B

Category 1: Populations numbering between around 25,000 and around 100,000 individuals and which do not fulfil the conditions in respect of Column A, as described above.

Category 2: Populations numbering more than around 100,000 individuals and considered to be in need of special attention as a result of:

  • a) Concentration onto a small number of sites at any stage of their annual cycle;

  • b) Dependence on a habitat type, which is under severe threat;

  • c) Showing significant long-term decline; or

  • d) Showing large fluctuations in population size or trend.

Column C

Category 1: Populations numbering more than around 100,000 individuals which could significantly benefit from international cooperation and which do not fulfil the conditions in respect of either Column A or Column B, above.

Review of Table 1

The Table shall be:

  • a) Reviewed regularly by the Technical Committee in accordance with article VII, paragraph 3(b), of the Agreement; and

  • b) Amended as necessary by the Meeting of the Parties, in accordance with article VI, paragraph 9(d) of the Agreement, in light of the conclusions of such reviews.

Definition of geographical terms used in range descriptions

Note that waterbird ranges respect biological, not political, boundaries and that precise alignment of biological and political entities is extremely unusual. The range descriptions used have no political significance and are for general guidance only, and for concise, mapped summaries of waterbird ranges, practitioners should consult the Critical Site Network Tool internet portal:

http://wow.wetlands.org/informationflyway/criticalsitenetworktool/tabid/1349/language/en-US/Default.aspx

North Africa

Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia.

   

West Africa

Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, the Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Togo.

   

Eastern Africa

Burundi, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, the United Republic of Tanzania.

   

North-west Africa

Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia.

   

North-east Africa

Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan.

   

Southern Africa

Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

   

Central Africa

Cameroon, Central African Republic, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Sao Tome and Principe.

   

Sub-Saharan Africa

All African states south of the Sahara.

   

Tropical Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa excluding Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa and Swaziland.

   

Western Palearctic

As defined in Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East and North Africa (Cramp & Simmons 1977).

   

North-west Europe

Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

   

Western Europe

North-west Europe with Portugal and Spain.

   

North-east Europe

The northern part of the Russian Federation west of the Urals.

   

North Europe

North-west Europe and North-east Europe, as defined above.

   

Eastern Europe

Belarus, the Russian Federation west of the Urals, Ukraine.

   

Central Europe

Austria, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Poland, the Russian Federation around the Gulf of Finland and Kaliningrad, Slovakia, Switzerland.

   

South-west Europe

Mediterranean France, Italy, Malta, Monaco, Portugal, San Marino, Spain.

   

South-east Europe

Albania, Armenia, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Georgia, Greece, Republic of Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Turkey.

   

South Europe

South-west Europe and South-east Europe, as defined above.

   

North Atlantic

Faroes, Greenland, Iceland, Ireland, Norway, the north-west coast of the Russian Federation, Svalbard, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

   

East Atlantic

Atlantic seaboard of Europe and North Africa from northern Norway to Morocco.

   

Western Siberia

The Russian Federation east of the Urals to the Yenisey River and south to the Kazakhstan border.

   

Central Siberia

The Russian Federation from the Yenisey River to the eastern boundary of the Taimyr Peninsula and south to the Altai Mountains.

   

West Mediterranean

Algeria, France, Italy, Malta, Monaco, Morocco, Portugal, San Marino, Spain, Tunisia.

   

East Mediterranean

Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Cyprus, Egypt, Greece, Israel, Lebanon, Libya, Montenegro, Serbia, Slovenia, the Syrian Arab Republic, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey.

   

Black Sea

Armenia, Bulgaria, Georgia, Republic of Moldova, Romania, the Russian Federation, Turkey, Ukraine.

   

Caspian

Azerbaijan, Islamic Republic of Iran, Kazakhstan, South-west Russia, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan.

   

South-west Asia

Bahrain, Iraq, Islamic Republic of Iran, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the Syrian Arab Republic, eastern Turkey, Turkmenistan, the United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Yemen.

   

Gulf

the Persian Gulf, Gulf of Oman and Arabian Sea west to the Gulf of Aden.

   

Western Asia

Western parts of the Russian Federation east of the Urals and the Caspian countries.

   

Central Asia

Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan.

   

Southern Asia

Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka.

   

Indian Ocean

Comoros, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles.

Key to abbreviations and symbols

bre:

breeding

win:

wintering

N:

Northern

E:

Eastern

S:

Southern

W:

Western

NE:

North-eastern

NW:

North-western

SE:

South-eastern

SW:

South-western

() Population status unknown. Conservation status estimated.

* By way of exception for those populations listed in Categories 2 and 3 in Column A and which are marked by an asterisk, hunting may continue to be conducted on a sustainable use basis. This sustainable use shall be conducted within the framework of special provisions of an international species action plan, which shall seek to implement the principles of adaptive harvest management (see paragraph 2.1.2 of Annex 3 to the Agreement).

Notes
  • 1. The population data used to compile Table 1 as far as possible correspond to the number of individuals in the potential breeding stock in the Agreement area. The status is based on the best available published population estimates.

  • 2. Suffixes (bre) or (win) in population listings are solely aids to population identification. They do not indicate seasonal restrictions to actions in respect of these populations under the Agreement and Action Plan.

  • 3. The brief descriptions used to identify the populations are based on the descriptions used in the most recently published edition of Waterbird Population Estimates.

  • 4. Slash signs (/) are used to separate breeding areas from wintering areas.

  • 5. Where a species’ population is listed in Table 1 with multiple categorisation, the obligations of the Action Plan relate to the strictest category listed.

 

A

B

C

       

SPHENISCIDAE

     

Spheniscus demersus

     

– Southern Africa

1b

2a 2c

 
       

GAVIIDAE

     

Gavia stellata

     

– North-west Europe (win)

 

2c

 

– Caspian, Black Sea & East Mediterranean (win)

1c

   

Gavia arctica arctica

     

– Northern Europe & Western Siberia/Europe

 

2c

 

Gavia arctica suschkini

     

– Central Siberia/Caspian

   

(1)

Gavia immer

     

– Europe (win)

1c

   

Gavia adamsii

     

– Northern Europe (win)

1c

   
       

PODICIPEDIDAE

     

Tachybaptus ruficollis ruficollis

     

– Europe & North-west Africa

   

1

Podiceps cristatus cristatus

     

– North-west & Western Europe

 

2c

 

– Black Sea & Mediterranean (win)

 

2c

 

– Caspian & South-west Asia (win)

2

   

Podiceps cristatus infuscatus

     

– Eastern Africa (Ethiopia to N Zambia)

1c

   

– Southern Africa

1c

   

Podiceps grisegena grisegena

     

– North-west Europe (win)

3c

   

– Black Sea & Mediterranean (win)

3c

   

– Caspian (win)

2

   

Podiceps auritus auritus

     

– North-west Europe (large-billed)

1c

   

– North-east Europe (small-billed)

2

   

– Caspian & South Asia (win)

2

   

Podiceps nigricollis nigricollis

     

– Europe/South & West Europe & North Africa

 

2c

 

– Western Asia/South-west & South Asia

 

1

 

Podiceps nigricollis gurneyi

     

– Southern Africa

2

   
       

PHAETHONTIDAE

     

Phaethon aetherus aetherus

     

South Atlantic

1c

   

Phaethon aetherus indicus

     

– Persian Gulf, Gulf of Aden, Red Sea

1c

   

Phaethon rubricauda rubricauda

     

– Indian Ocean

2

   

Phaethon lepturus lepturus

     

- W Indian Ocean

2

   
       

PELECANIDAE

     

Pelecanus onocrotalus

     

– Southern Africa

 

1

 

– West Africa

 

1

 

– Eastern Africa

   

1

– Europe & Western Asia (bre)

1a 3c

   

Pelecanus rufescens

     

– Tropical Africa & SW Arabia

 

1

 

Pelecanus crispus

     

– Black Sea & Mediterranean (win)

1a 1b 1c

   

– South-west Asia & South Asia (win)

1a 1b 1c

   
       

SULIDAE

     

Sula (Morus) bassana

   

1

Sula (Morus) capensis

     

– Southern Africa

1b

2a 2c

 

Sula dactylatra melanops

     

– W Indian Ocean

2

   
       

PHALACROCORACIDAE

     

Phalacrocorax coronatus

     

– Coastal South-west Africa

1c

   

Phalacrocorax pygmeus

     

– Black Sea & Mediterranean

 

1

 

– South-west Asia

 

1

 

Phalacrocorax neglectus

     

– Coastal South-west Africa

1b 2

   

Phalacrocorax carbo carbo

     

– North-west Europe

   

1

Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis

     

– Northern & Central Europe

   

1

– Black Sea & Mediterranean

   

1

– West & South-west Asia

   

(1)

Phalacrocorax carbo lucidus

     

– Coastal West Africa

 

1

 

– Central & Eastern Africa

   

1

– Coastal Southern Africa

2

   

Phalacrocorax nigrogularis

     

– Arabian Coast

1b

2a 2c

 

– Gulf of Aden, Socotra, Arabian Sea

1b

1

 

Phalacrocorax capensis

     

– Coastal Southern Africa

4

   
       

FREGATIDAE

     

Fregata minor aldabrensis

     

– W Indian Ocean

2

   

Fregata ariel iredalei

     

– W Indian Ocean

2

   
       

ARDEIDAE

     

Egretta ardesiaca

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

 

1

 

Egretta vinaceigula

     

– South-central Africa

1b 1c

   

Egretta garzetta garzetta

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

   

(1)

– Western Europe, NW Africa

   

1

– Central & E Europe, Black Sea, E Mediterranean

 

1

 

– Western Asia/SW Asia, NE & Eastern Africa

 

(1)

 

Egretta gularis gularis

     

– West Africa

 

(1)

 

Egretta gularis schistacea

     

– North-east Africa & Red Sea

 

(1)

 

– South-west Asia & South Asia

2

   

Egretta dimorpha

     

– Coastal Eastern Africa

2

   

Ardea cinerea cinerea

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

   

1

– Northern & Western Europe

   

1

– Central & Eastern Europe

   

1

– West & South-west Asia (bre)

   

(1)

Ardea melanocephala

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

   

(1)

Ardea purpurea purpurea

     

– Tropical Africa

 

1

 

– West Europe & West Mediterranean/West Africa

2

   

– East Europe, Black Sea & Mediterranean/Sub-Saharan Africa

 

(2c)

 

Casmerodius albus albus

     

– W, C & SE Europe/Black Sea & Mediterranean

 

1

 

– Western Asia/South-west Asia

 

(1)

 

Casmerodius albus melanorhynchos

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa & Madagascar

   

(1)

Mesophoyx intermedia brachyrhyncha

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

 

1

 

Bubulcus ibis ibis

     

– Southern Africa

   

1

– Tropical Africa

   

1

– South-west Europe

   

1

– North-west Africa

   

1

– East Mediterranean & South-west Asia

 

1

 

Ardeola ralloides ralloides

     

– SW Europe, NW Africa (bre)

1c

   

– C & E Europe/Black Sea & E Mediterranean (bre)

 

1

 

– West & South-west Asia/Sub-Saharan Africa

 

(1)

 

Ardeola ralloides paludivaga

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa & Madagascar

   

(1)

Ardeola idae

     

– Madagascar & Aldabra/Central & Eastern Africa

1b 1c

   

Ardeola rufiventris

     

– Tropical Eastern & Southern Africa

 

(1)

 

Nycticorax nycticorax nycticorax

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa & Madagascar

   

1

– W Europe, NW Africa (bre)

3c

   

– C & E Europe/Black Sea & E Mediterranean (bre)

 

2c

 

– Western Asia/SW Asia & NE Africa

 

(1)

 

Ixobrychus minutus minutus

     

– W Europe, NW Africa/ Sub-Saharan Africa

2

   

– C & E Europe, Black Sea & E Mediterranean/Sub-Saharan Africa

 

2c

 

– West & South-west Asia/Sub-Saharan Africa

 

(1)

 

Ixobrychus minutus payesii

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

 

(1)

 

Ixobrychus sturmii

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

 

(1)

 

Botaurus stellaris stellaris

     

W Europe, NW Africa (bre)

1c

   

C & E Europe, Black Sea & E Mediterranean (bre)

 

2c

 

– South-west Asia (win)

 

1

 

Botaurus stellaris capensis

     

– Southern Africa

1c

   
       

CICONIIDAE

     

Mycteria ibis

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa (excluding Madagascar)

 

1

 

Anastomus lamelligerus lamelligerus

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

   

1

Ciconia nigra

     

– Southern Africa

1c

   

– South-west Europe/West Africa

1c

   

– Central & Eastern Europe/Sub-Saharan Africa

2

   

Ciconia abdimii

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa & SW Arabia

 

(2c)

 

Ciconia episcopus microscelis

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

 

(1)

 

Ciconia ciconia ciconia

     

– Southern Africa

1c

   

–W Europe & North-west Africa/Sub-Saharan Africa

3b

   

– Central & Eastern Europe/Sub-Saharan Africa

   

1

– Western Asia/South-west Asia

2

   

Leptoptilos crumeniferus

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

   

1

       

BALAENICIPITIDAE

     

Balaeniceps rex

     

– Central Tropical Africa

1b 1c

   
       

THRESKIORNITHIDAE

     

Plegadis falcinellus falcinellus

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa (bre)

   

1

– Black Sea & Mediterranean/West Africa

3c

   

– South-west Asia/Eastern Africa

 

(1)

 

Geronticus eremita

     

– Morocco

1a 1b 1c

   

– South-west Asia

1a 1b 1c

   

Threskiornis aethiopicus aethiopicus

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

   

1

– Iraq & Iran

1c

   

Platalea leucorodia leucorodia

     

– West Europe/West Mediterranean & West Africa

2

   

– Cent. & SE Europe/Mediterranean & Tropical Africa

2

   

Platalea leucorodia archeri

     

– Red Sea & Somalia

1c

   

Platalea leucorodia balsaci

     

– Coastal West Africa (Mauritania)

1c

   

Platalea leucorodia major

     

– Western Asia/South-west & South Asia

2

   

Platalea alba

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

 

1

 
       

PHOENICOPTERIDAE

     

Phoenicopterus roseus

     

– West Africa

3a

   

– Eastern Africa

3a

   

– Southern Africa (to Madagascar)

3a

   

– West Mediterranean

 

2a

 

– East Mediterranean

3a

   

– South-west & South Asia

 

2a

 

Phoeniconaias minor

     

– West Africa

2

   

– Eastern Africa

4

   

– Southern Africa (to Madagascar)

3a

   
       

ANATIDAE

     

Dendrocygna bicolor

     

– West Africa (Senegal to Chad)

2

   

– Eastern & Southern Africa

   

(1)

Dendrocygna viduata

     

– West Africa (Senegal to Chad)

   

1

– Eastern & Southern Africa

   

1

Thalassornis leuconotus leuconotus

     

– West Africa

1c

   

– Eastern & Southern Africa

2*

   

Oxyura leucocephala

     

– West Mediterranean (Spain & Morocco)

1a 1b 1c

   

– Algeria & Tunisia

1a 1b 1c

   

– East Mediterranean, Turkey & South-west Asia

1a 1b 1c

   

Oxyura maccoa

     

– Eastern Africa

1c

   

– Southern Africa

1c

   

Cygnus olor

     

– North-west Mainland & Central Europe

   

1

– Black Sea

 

1

 

– West & Central Asia/Caspian

 

2a 2d

 

Cygnus cygnus

     

– Iceland/UK & Ireland

2

   

– North-west Mainland Europe

 

1

 

– N Europe & W Siberia/Black Sea & E Mediterranean

2

   

– West & Central Siberia/Caspian

2

   

Cygnus columbianus bewickii

     

– Western Siberia & NE Europe/North-west Europe

2

   

– Northern Siberia/Caspian

1c

   

Anser brachyrhynchus

     

– East Greenland & Iceland/UK

 

2a

 

– Svalbard/North-west Europe

 

1

 

Anser fabalis fabalis

     

– North-east Europe/North-west Europe

3c*

   

– West & Central Siberia/Turkmenistan to W China

1c

   

Anser fabalis rossicus

     

– West & Central Siberia/NE & SW Europe

   

(1)

Anser albifrons albifrons

     

– NW Siberia & NE Europe/North-west Europe

   

1

– Western Siberia/Central Europe

   

1

– Western Siberia/Black Sea & Turkey

   

1

– Northern Siberia/Caspian & Iraq

2

   

Anser albifrons flavirostris

     

– Greenland/Ireland & UK

2*

   

Anser erythropus

     

– NE Europe & W Siberia/Black Sea & Caspian

1a 1b 2

   

– Fennoscandia

1a 1b 1c

   

Anser anser anser

     

– Iceland/UK & Ireland

 

1

 

– NW Europe/South-west Europe

   

1

– Central Europe/North Africa

 

1

 

Anser anser rubrirostris

     

– Black Sea & Turkey

 

1

 

– Western Siberia/Caspian & Iraq

   

1

Branta leucopsis

     

– East Greenland/Scotland & Ireland

 

1

 

– Svalbard/South-west Scotland

3a

   

– Russia/Germany & Netherlands

   

1

Branta bernicla bernicla

     

– Western Siberia/Western Europe

 

2b

 

Branta bernicla hrota

     

– Svalbard/Denmark & UK

1c

   

– Canada & Greenland/Ireland

3a

   

Branta ruficollis

     

– Northern Siberia/Black Sea & Caspian

1a 1b 3a 3c

   

Alopochen aegyptiacus

     

– West Africa

1c

   

– Eastern & Southern Africa

   

1

Tadorna ferruginea

     

– North-west Africa

1c

   

– East Mediterranean & Black Sea/North-east Africa

2

   

– Western Asia & Caspian/Iran & Iraq

 

1

 

Tadorna cana

     

– Southern Africa

3c

   

Tadorna tadorna

     

– North-west Europe

 

2a

 

– Black Sea & Mediterranean

   

1

– Western Asia/Caspian & Middle East

 

1

 

Plectropterus gambensis gambensis

     

– West Africa

 

1

 

– Eastern Africa (Sudan to Zambia)

   

1

Plectropterus gambensis niger

     

– Southern Africa

 

1

 

Sarkidiornis melanotos melanotos

     

– West Africa

 

1

 

– Southern & Eastern Africa

   

1

Nettapus auritus

     

– West Africa

1c

   

– Southern & Eastern Africa

   

(1)

Anas capensis

     

– Eastern Africa (Rift Valley)

1c

   

– Lake Chad basin2

1c

   

– Southern Africa (N to Angola & Zambia)

   

1

Anas strepera strepera

     

– North-west Europe

 

1

 

– North-east Europe/Black Sea & Mediterranean

   

1

– Western Siberia/SW Asia & NE Africa

   

(1)

Anas penelope

     

– Western Siberia & NE Europe/NW Europe

   

1

– W Siberia & NE Europe/Black Sea & Mediterranean

   

1

– Western Siberia/SW Asia & NE Africa

 

2c

 

Anas platyrhynchos platyrhynchos

     

– North-west Europe

   

1

– Northern Europe/West Mediterranean

   

1

– Eastern Europe/Black Sea & East Mediterranean

 

2c

 

– Western Siberia/South-west Asia

   

(1)

Anas undulata undulata

     

– Southern Africa

   

1

Anas clypeata

     

– North-west & Central Europe (win)

 

1

 

– W Siberia, NE & E Europe/S Europe & West Africa

   

1

– W Siberia/SW Asia, NE & Eastern Africa

 

2c

 

Anas erythrorhyncha

     

– Southern Africa

   

1

– Eastern Africa

   

1

– Madagascar

2

   

Anas acuta

     

– North-west Europe

 

1

 

– W Siberia, NE & E Europe/S Europe & West Africa

   

1

– Western Siberia/SW Asia & Eastern Africa

   

(1)

Anas querquedula

     

– Western Siberia & Europe/West Africa

 

2c

 

– Western Siberia/SW Asia, NE & Eastern Africa

   

(1)

Anas crecca crecca

     

– North-west Europe

   

1

– W Siberia & NE Europe/Black Sea & Mediterranean

   

1

– Western Siberia/SW Asia & NE Africa

 

2c

 

Anas hottentota

     

– Lake Chad Basin

1c

   

– Eastern Africa (south to N Zambia)

 

1

 

– Southern Africa (north to S Zambia)

 

1

 

Marmaronetta angustirostris

     

– West Mediterranean/West Medit. & West Africa

1a 1b 1c

   

– East Mediterranean

1a 1b 1c

   

– South-west Asia

1a 1b 2

   

Netta rufina

     

– South-west & Central Europe/West Mediterranean

 

1

 

– Black Sea & East Mediterranean

3c

   

– Western & Central Asia/South-west Asia

   

1

Netta erythrophthalma brunnea

     

– Southern & Eastern Africa

 

1

 

Aythya ferina

     

– North-east Europe/North-west Europe

 

2c

 

– Central & NE Europe/Black Sea & Mediterranean

 

2c

 

– Western Siberia/South-west Asia

 

2c

 

Aythya nyroca

     

– West Mediterranean/North & West Africa

1a 1c

   

– Eastern Europe/E Mediterranean & Sahelian Africa

1a 3c

   

– Western Asia/SW Asia & NE Africa

1a 3c

   

Aythya fuligula

     

– North-west Europe (win)

   

1

– Central Europe, Black Sea & Mediterranean (win)

 

2c

 

– Western Siberia/SW Asia & NE Africa

   

(1)

Aythya marila marila

     

– Northern Europe/Western Europe

 

2c

 

– Western Siberia/Black Sea & Caspian

   

1

Somateria mollissima mollissima

     

– Baltic, Denmark & Netherlands

 

2d

 

– Norway & Russia

   

1

Somateria mollissima borealis

     

– Svalbard & Franz Joseph (bre)

 

1

 

Somateria spectabilis

     

– East Greenland, NE Europe & Western Siberia

   

1

Polysticta stelleri

     

– Western Siberia/North-east Europe

1a 1b 2

   

Clangula hyemalis

     

– Iceland & Greenland

   

1

– Western Siberia/North Europe

 

2c

 

Melanitta nigra nigra

     

– W Siberia & N Europe/W Europe & NW Africa

 

2a 2c

 

Melanitta fusca fusca

     

– Western Siberia & Northern Europe/NW Europe

 

2a 2c

 

– Black Sea & Caspian

1c

   

Bucephala clangula clangula

     

– North-west & Central Europe (win)

   

1

– North-east Europe/Adriatic

   

1

– Western Siberia & North-east Europe/Black Sea

 

1

 

– Western Siberia/Caspian

   

1

Mergellus albellus

     

– North-west & Central Europe (win)

3a

   

– North-east Europe/Black Sea & East Mediterranean

 

1

 

– Western Siberia/South-west Asia

 

1

 

Mergus serrator serrator

     

– North-west & Central Europe (win)

   

1

– North-east Europe/Black Sea & Mediterranean

 

1

 

– Western Siberia/South-west & Central Asia

1c

   

Mergus merganser merganser

     

– North-west & Central Europe (win)

   

1

– North-east Europe/Black Sea

1c

   

– Western Siberia/Caspian

2

   
       

GRUIDAE

     

Balearica pavonina pavonina

     

– West Africa (Senegal to Chad)

1b 1c

   

Balearica pavonina ceciliae

     

– Eastern Africa (Sudan to Uganda)

1b 3c

   

Balearica regulorum regulorum

     

– Southern Africa (N to Angola & S Zimbabwe)

1b 1c

   

Balearica regulorum gibbericeps

     

– Eastern Africa (Kenya to Mozambique)

1b 3c

   

Grus leucogeranus

     

– Iran (win)

1a 1b 1c

   

Grus virgo

     

– Black Sea (Ukraine)/North-east Africa

1c

   

– Turkey (bre)

1c

   

– Kalmykia/North-east Africa

 

1

 

Grus paradisea

     

– Extreme Southern Africa

1b

1

 

Grus carunculatus

     

– Central & Southern Africa

1b 1c

   

Grus grus

     

– North-west Europe/Iberia & Morocco

   

1

– North-east & Central Europe/North Africa

 

1

 

– Eastern Europe/Turkey, Middle East & NE Africa

3c

   

– Turkey & Georgia (bre)

1c

   

– Western Siberia/South Asia

 

(1)

 
       

RALLIDAE

     

Sarothrura elegans elegans

     

– NE, Eastern & Southern Africa

   

(1)

Sarothrura elegans reichenovi

     

– S West Africa to Central Africa

   

(1)

Sarothrura boehmi

     

– Central Africa

1c

   

Sarothrura ayresi

     

– Ethiopia

1a 1b 1c

   

– Southern Africa

1a 1b 1c

   

Rallus aquaticus aquaticus

     

– Europe & North Africa

 

2c

 

Rallus aquaticus korejewi

     

– Western Siberia/South-west Asia

   

(1)

Rallus caerulescens

     

– Southern & Eastern Africa

   

(1)

Crecopsis egregia

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

   

(1)

Crex crex

     

– Europe & Western Asia/Sub-Saharan Africa

   

1

Amaurornis flavirostris

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

   

1

Porzana parva parva

     

– Western Eurasia/Africa

 

2c

 

Porzana pusilla intermedia

     

– Europe (bre)

1c

   

Porzana porzana

     

– Europe/Africa

 

2d

 

Aenigmatolimnas marginalis

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

(2)

   

Porphyrio alleni

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

   

(1)

Gallinula chloropus chloropus

     

– Europe & North Africa

   

1

– West & South-west Asia

   

(1)

Gallinula angulata

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

   

(1)

Fulica cristata

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa

   

1

– Spain & Morocco

1c

   

Fulica atra atra

     

– North-west Europe (win)

   

1

– Black Sea & Mediterranean (win)

   

1

– South-west Asia (win)

   

(1)

       

DROMADIDAE

     

Dromas ardeola

     

– North-west Indian Ocean, Red Sea & Gulf

 

1

 
       

HAEMATOPODIDAE

     

Haematopus ostralegus ostralegus

     

– Europe/South & West Europe & NW Africa

 

2c

 

Haematopus ostralegus longipes

     

– SE Eur & W Asia/SW Asia & NE Africa

 

2c

 

Haematopus moquini

     

– Coastal Southern Africa

1c

   
       

RECURVIROSTRIDAE

     

Himantopus himantopus himantopus

     

– Sub-Saharan Africa (excluding south)

   

(1)

– Southern Africa (‘meridionalis’)

2

   

– SW Europe & North-west Africa/West Africa

 

1

 

– Central Europe & E Mediterranean/N-Central Africa

 

1

 

– W, C & SW Asia/SW Asia & NE Africa

 

(1)

 

Recurvirostra avosetta

     

– Southern Africa

2

   

– Eastern Africa

 

(1)

 

– Western Europe & North-west Africa (bre)

 

1

 

– South-east Europe, Black Sea & Turkey (bre)

(3c)

   

– West & South-west Asia/Eastern Africa

2

   
       

BURHINIDAE

     

Burhinus senegalensis senegalensis

     

– West Africa

 

1

 

Burhinus senegalensis inornatus

     

– North-east & Eastern Africa

 

1

 
       

GLAREOLIDAE

     

Pluvianus aegyptius aegyptius

     

– West Africa

 

(1)

 

– Eastern Africa

(2)

   

– Lower Congo Basin

2

   

Glareola pratincola pratincola

     

– Western Europe & NW Africa/West Africa

2

   

– Black Sea & E Mediterranean/Eastern Sahel zone

2

   

– SW Asia/SW Asia & NE Africa

 

(1)

 

Glareola nordmanni

     

– SE Europe & Western Asia/Southern Africa

4

   

Glareola ocularis

     

– Madagascar/East Africa

1c

   

Glareola nuchalis nuchalis

     

– Eastern & Central Africa

 

(1)

 

Glareola nuchalis liberiae

     

– West Africa

   

1

Glareola cinerea cinerea

     

– SE West Africa & Central Africa

(2)

   
       

CHARADRIIDAE

     

Pluvialis apricaria apricaria

     

– Britain, Ireland, Denmark, Germany & Baltic (bre)

 

2c

 

Pluvialis apricaria altifrons

     

– Iceland & Faroes/East Atlantic coast

   

1

– Northern Europe/Western Europe & NW Africa

   

1

– Northern Siberia/Caspian & Asia Minor

 

(1)

 

Pluvialis fulva

     

– North-central Siberia/South & SW Asia, NE Africa

 

(1)

 

Pluvialis squatarola

     

– W Siberia & Canada/W Europe & W Africa

   

1

– C & E Siberia/SW Asia, Eastern & Southern Africa

 

1

 

Charadrius hiaticula hiaticula

     

– Northern Europe/Europe & North Africa

 

1

 

Charadrius hiaticula psammodroma

     

– Canada, Greenland & Iceland/W & S Africa

 

(2c)

 

Charadrius hiaticula tundrae

     

– NE Europe & Siberia/SW Asia, E & S Africa

   

(1)

Charadrius dubius curonicus

     

– Europe & North-west Africa/West Africa

   

1

– West & South-west Asia/Eastern Africa

   

(1)

Charadrius pecuarius pecuarius

     

– Southern & Eastern Africa

   

(1)

– West Africa

 

(1)

 

Charadrius tricollaris tricollaris

     

– Southern & Eastern Africa

   

1

Charadrius forbesi

     

– Western & Central Africa

 

(1)

 

Charadrius pallidus pallidus

     

– Southern Africa

2

   

Charadrius pallidus venustus

     

– Eastern Africa

1c

   

Charadrius alexandrinus alexandrinus

     

– West Europe & West Mediterranean/West Africa

3c

   

– Black Sea & East Mediterranean/Eastern Sahel

3c

   

– SW & Central Asia/SW Asia & NE Africa

 

(1)

 

Charadrius marginatus mechowi

     

mechowi/tenellus Inland East & Central Africa

2

   

– Coastal E Africa

2

   

– West Africa

2

   

Charadrius mongolus pamirensis

     

– West-central Asia/SW Asia & Eastern Africa

   

1

Charadrius leschenaultii columbinus

     

– Turkey & SW Asia/E. Mediterranean & Red Sea

1c

   

Charadrius leschenaultii crassirostris

     

– Caspian & SW Asia/Arabia & NE Africa

 

(1)

 

Charadrius leschenaultii leschenaultii

     

– Central Asia/Eastern & Southern Africa

 

(1)

 

Charadrius asiaticus

     

– SE Europe & West Asia/E & South-central Africa

3c

   

Eudromias morinellus

     

– Europe/North-west Africa

(3c)

   

– Asia/Middle East

 

(1)

 

Vanellus vanellus

     

– Europe, W Asia/Europe, N Africa & SW Asia

   

1

Vanellus spinosus

     

– Black Sea & Mediterranean (bre)

 

1

 

Vanellus albiceps

     

– West & Central Africa

 

(1)

 

Vanellus senegallus senegallus

     

– West Africa

 

(1)

 

Vanellus senegallus solitaneus

     

– South-west Africa

 

(1)

 

Vanellus senegallus lateralis

     

– Eastern & South-east Africa

 

1

 

Vanellus lugubris

     

– Southern West Africa

2

   

– Central & Eastern Africa

3c

   

Vanellus melanopterus minor

     

– Southern Africa

1c

   

Vanellus coronatus coronatus

     

– Eastern & Southern Africa

   

1

– Central Africa

(2)

   

Vanellus coronatus xerophilus

     

– South-west Africa

 

(1)

 

Vanellus superciliosus

     

– West & Central Africa

(2)

   

Vanellus gregarius

     

– SE Europe & Western Asia/North-east Africa

1a 1b 2

   

– Central Asian Republics/NW India

1a 1b 1c

   

Vanellus leucurus

     

– SW Asia/SW Asia & North-east Africa

2

   

– Central Asian Republics/South Asia

 

(1)

 
       

SCOLOPACIDAE

     

Scolopax rusticola

     

– Europe/South & West Europe & North Africa

   

1

– Western Siberia/South-west Asia (Caspian)

   

(1)

Gallinago stenura

     

– Northern Siberia/South Asia & Eastern Africa

   

(1)

Gallinago media

     

– Scandinavia/probably West Africa

4

   

– Western Siberia & NE Europe/South-east Africa

4

   

Gallinago gallinago gallinago

     

– Europe/South & West Europe & NW Africa

 

2c

 

– Western Siberia/South-west Asia & Africa

   

1

Gallinago gallinago faeroeensis

     

– Iceland, Faroes & Northern Scotland/Ireland

   

1

Lymnocryptes minimus

     

– Northern Europe/S & W Europe & West Africa

 

2b

 

– Western Siberia/SW Asia & NE Africa

   

1

Limosa limosa limosa

     

– Western Europe/NW & West Africa

4

   

– Eastern Europe/Central & Eastern Africa

4

   

– West-central Asia/SW Asia & Eastern Africa

4

   

Limosa limosa islandica

     

– Iceland/Western Europe

4

   

Limosa lapponica lapponica

     

– Northern Europe/Western Europe

 

2a

 

Limosa lapponica taymyrensis

     

– Western Siberia/West & South-west Africa

 

2a 2c

 

Limosa lapponica menzbieri

     

– Central Siberia/South & SW Asia & Eastern Africa

   

(1)

Numenius phaeopus phaeopus

     

– Northern Europe/West Africa

   

(1)

– West Siberia/Southern & Eastern Africa

   

(1)

Numenius phaeopus islandicus

     

– Iceland, Faroes & Scotland/West Africa

   

1

Numenius phaeopus alboaxillaris

     

– South-west Asia/Eastern Africa

1c

   

Numenius tenuirostris

     

– Central Siberia/Mediterranean & SW Asia

1a 1b 1c

   

Numenius arquata arquata

     

– Europe/Europe, North & West Africa

4

   

Numenius arquata orientalis

     

– Western Siberia/SW Asia, E & S Africa

3c

   

Numenius arquata suschkini

     

– South-east Europe & South-west Asia (bre)

1c

   

Tringa erythropus

     

– N Europe/Southern Europe, North & West Africa

   

(1)

– Western Siberia/SW Asia, NE & Eastern Africa

 

(1)

 

Tringa totanus totanus

     

– Northern Europe (breeding)

   

1

– Central & East Europe (breeding)

 

2c

 

Tringa totanus britannica

     

– Britain & Ireland/Britain, Ireland, France

 

2c

 

Tringa totanus ussuriensis

     

– Western Asia/SW Asia, NE & Eastern Africa

   

(1)

Tringa totanus robusta

     

– Iceland & Faroes/Western Europe

   

1

Tringa stagnatilis

     

– Eastern Europe/West & Central Africa

 

(1)

 

– Western Asia/SW Asia, Eastern & Southern Africa

 

(1)

 

Tringa nebularia

     

– Northern Europe/SW Europe, NW & West Africa

   

1

– Western Siberia/SW Asia, E & S Africa

   

(1)

Tringa ochropus

     

– Northern Europe/S & W Europe, West Africa

   

1

– Western Siberia/SW Asia, NE & Eastern Africa

   

(1)

Tringa glareola

     

– North-west Europe/West Africa

   

1

– NE Europe & W Siberia/Eastern & Southern Africa

   

(1)

Xenus cinereus

     

– NE Europe & W Siberia/SW Asia, E & S Africa

   

1

Actitis hypoleucos

     

– West & Central Europe/West Africa

   

1

– E Europe & W Siberia/Central, E & S Africa

   

(1)

Arenaria interpres interpres

     

– NE Canada & Greenland/W Europe & NW Africa

   

1

– Northern Europe/West Africa

   

1

– West & Central Siberia/SW Asia, E & S Africa

   

(1)

Calidris tenuirostris

     

– Eastern Siberia/SW Asia & W Southern Asia

1b 1c

   

Calidris canutus canutus

     

– Northern Siberia/West & Southern Africa

 

2a 2c

 

Calidris canutus islandica

     

– NE Canada & Greenland/Western Europe

 

2a

 

Calidris alba

     

– East Atlantic Europe, West & Southern Africa (win)

   

1

– South-west Asia, Eastern & Southern Africa (win)

   

1

Calidris minuta

     

– N Europe/S Europe, North & West Africa

 

(2c)

 

– Western Siberia/SW Asia, E & S Africa

   

(1)

Calidris temminckii

     

– Fennoscandia/North & West Africa

 

(1)

 

– NE Europe & W Siberia/SW Asia & Eastern Africa

   

(1)

Calidris maritima maritima

     

– N Europe & W Siberia (breeding)

 

1

 

– NE Canada & N Greenland (breeding)

3c

   

Calidris alpina alpina

     

– NE Europe & NW Siberia/W Europe & NW Africa

   

1

Calidris alpina centralis

     

– Central Siberia/SW Asia & NE Africa

   

(1)

Calidris alpina schinzii

     

– Iceland & Greenland/NW and West Africa

   

1

– Britain & Ireland/SW Europe & NW Africa

2

   

– Baltic/SW Europe & NW Africa

1c

   

Calidris alpina arctica

     

– NE Greenland/West Africa

3a

   

Calidris ferruginea

     

– Western Siberia/West Africa

   

1

– Central Siberia/SW Asia, E & S Africa

   

1

Limicola falcinellus falcinellus

     

– Northern Europe/SW Asia & Africa

3c

   

Philomachus pugnax

     

– Northern Europe & Western Siberia/West Africa

 

2c

 

– Northern Siberia/SW Asia, E & S Africa

 

(2c)

 

Phalaropus lobatus

     

– Western Eurasia/Arabian Sea

   

1

Phalaropus fulicarius

     

– Canada & Greenland/Atlantic coast of Africa

 

2c

 
       

STERCORARIIDAE

     

Catharacta skua

 

1

 

Stercorarius longicaudus longicaudus

   

1

       

LARIDAE

     

Larus leucophthalmus

     

– Red Sea & nearby coasts

1a

1

 

Larus hemprichii

     

– Red Sea, Gulf, Arabia & Eastern Africa

   

1

Larus canus canus

     

– NW & Cent. Europe/Atlantic coast & Mediterranean

 

2c

 

Larus canus heinei

     

– NE Europe & Western Siberia/Black Sea & Caspian

   

1

Larus audouinii

     

– Mediterranean/N & W coasts of Africa

1a 3a

   

Larus marinus

     

– North & West Europe

   

1

Larus dominicanus vetula

     

– Coastal Southern Africa

 

1

 

Larus hyperboreus hyperboreus

     

– Svalbard & N Russia (bre)

   

(1)

Larus hyperboreus leuceretes

     

– Canada, Greenland & Iceland (bre)

   

(1)

Larus glaucoides glaucoides

     

– Greenland/Iceland & North-west Europe

   

1

Larus argentatus argentatus

     

– North & North-west Europe

   

1

Larus argentatus argenteus

     

– Iceland & Western Europe

 

2c

 

Larus heuglini

     

– NE Europe & W Siberia/SW Asia & NE Africa

   

(1)

Larus (heuglini) barabensis

     

– South-west Siberia/South-west Asia

   

(1)

Larus armenicus

     

– Armenia, Eastern Turkey & NW Iran

3a

   

Larus cachinnans cachinnans

     

– Black Sea & Western Asia/SW Asia, NE Africa

   

1

Larus cachinnans michahellis

     

– Mediterranean, Iberia & Morocco

   

1

Larus fuscus fuscus

     

– NE Europe/Black Sea, SW Asia & Eastern Africa

3c

   

Larus fuscus graellsii

     

– Western Europe/Mediterranean & West Africa

   

1

Larus fuscus intermedius

     

– S Scandinavia, Netherlands, Ebro Delta, Spain

   

1

Larus ichthyaetus

     

– Black Sea & Caspian/South-west Asia

3a

   

Larus cirrocephalus poiocephalus

     

– West Africa

 

(1)

 

– Central & Eastern Africa

   

(1)

– Coastal Southern Africa (excluding Madagascar)

 

(1)

 

Larus hartlaubii

     

– Coastal South-west Africa

 

1

 

Larus ridibundus

     

– W Europe/W Europe, W Mediterranean, West Africa

   

1

– East Europe/Black Sea & East Mediterranean

   

1

– West Asia/SW Asia & NE Africa

   

(1)

Larus genei

     

– West Africa (bre)

2

   

– Black Sea & Mediterranean (bre)

 

2a

 

– West, South-west & South Asia (bre)

   

1

Larus melanocephalus

     

– W Europe, Mediterranean & NW Africa

 

2a

 

Larus minutus

     

– Central & E Europe/SW Europe & W Mediterranean

   

1

– W Asia/E Mediterranean, Black Sea & Caspian

 

(1)

 

Xema sabini sabini

     

– Canada & Greenland/SE Atlantic

   

(1)

Rissa tridactyla tridactyla

 

2c

 
       

STERNIDAE

     

Sterna nilotica nilotica

     

– Western Europe/West Africa

2

   

– Black Sea & East Mediterranean/Eastern Africa

3c

   

– West & Central Asia/South-west Asia

2

   

Sterna caspia caspia

     

– Southern Africa (bre)

1c

   

– West Africa (bre)

 

1

 

– Baltic (bre)

1c

   

– Black Sea (bre)

1c

   

– Caspian (bre)

2

   

Sterna maxima albidorsalis

     

– West Africa (bre)

 

2a

 

Sterna bengalensis bengalensis

     

– Gulf/Southern Asia

   

1

Sterna bengalensis par

     

– Red Sea/Eastern Africa

 

1

 

Sterna bengalensis emigrata

     

– S Mediterranean/NW & West Africa coasts

1c

   

Sterna bergii bergii

     

– Southern Africa (Angola – Mozambique)

2

   

Sterna bergii enigma

     

– Madagascar & Mozambique/Southern Africa

1c

   

Sterna bergii thalassina

     

– Eastern Africa & Seychelles

1c

   

Sterna bergii velox

     

– Red Sea & North-east Africa

2

   

Sterna sandvicensis sandvicensis

     

– Western Europe/West Africa

   

1

– Black Sea & Mediterranean (bre)

 

2a

 

– West & Central Asia/South-west & South Asia

   

1

Sterna dougallii dougallii

     

– Southern Africa

1c

   

– East Africa

3a

   

– Europe (bre)

1c

   

Sterna dougallii arideensis

     

– Madagascar, Seychelles & Mascarenes

2

   

Sterna dougallii bangsi

     

– North Arabian Sea (Oman)

1c

   

Sterna vittata vittata

     

– P.Edward, Marion, Crozet & Kerguelen/South Africa

1c

   

Sterna vittata tristanensis

     

– Tristan da Cunha & Gough/South Africa

1c

   

Sterna hirundo hirundo

     

– Southern & Western Europe (bre)

   

1

– Northern & Eastern Europe (bre)

   

1

– Western Asia (bre)

   

(1)

Sterna paradisaea

     

– Western Eurasia (bre)

   

1

Sterna albifrons albifrons

     

– Europe north of Mediterranean (bre)

2

   

– West Mediterranean / W Africa (bre)

3b

   

– Black Sea & East Mediterranean (bre)

3b 3c

   

– Caspian (bre)

2

   

Sterna albifrons guineae

     

– West Africa (bre)

1c

   

Sterna saundersi

     

– W South Asia, Red Sea, Gulf & Eastern Africa

 

(1)

 

Sterna balaenarum

     

– Namibia & South Africa/Atlantic coast to Ghana

2

   

Sterna repressa

     

– W South Asia, Red Sea, Gulf & Eastern Africa

 

2c

 

Sterna anaethetus melanopterus

     

– W Africa

1c

   

Sterna anaethetus fuligula

     

– Red Sea, E Africa, Persian Gulf, Arabian Sea to W India

   

1

Sterna anaethetus antarctica

     

– W Indian Ocean

2

   

Sterna fuscata nubilosa

     

– Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, E to Pacific

 

2a

 

Chlidonias hybridus hybridus

     

– Western Europe & North-west Africa (bre)

 

1

 

– Black Sea & East Mediterranean (bre)

   

(1)

– Caspian (bre)

 

(1)

 

Chlidonias hybridus sclateri

     

– Eastern Africa (Kenya & Tanzania)

2

   

– Southern Africa (Malawi & Zambia to South Africa)

(2)

   

Chlidonias leucopterus

     

– Eastern Europe & Western Asia/Africa

   

(1)

Chlidonias niger niger

     

– Europe & Western Asia/Atlantic coast of Africa

 

2c

 

Anous stolidus plumbeigularis

     

– Red Sea & Gulf of Aden

 

1

 

Anous tenuirostris tenuirostris

     

– Indian OceanIslands to E Africa

   

1

       

RYNCHOPIDAE

     

Rynchops flavirostris

     

– Coastal West Africa & Central Africa

2

   

– Eastern & Southern Africa

2

   
       

ALCIDAE

     

Alle alle alle

     

– High Arctic, Baffin Is – Novaya Zemlya

   

1

Uria aalge aalge

     

– E North America, Greenland, Iceland, Faeroes, Scotland, S Norway, Baltic

 

2c

 

Uria aalge albionis

     

– Ireland, S Britain, France, Iberia, Helgoland

   

1

Uria aalge hyperborea

     

– Svalbard, N Norway to Novaya Zemlya

   

1

Uria lomvia lomvia

     

– E North America, Greenland, E to Severnaya Zemlya

 

2c

 

Alca torda torda

     

– E North America, Greenland, E to Baltic & White Seas

   

1

Alca torda islandica

     

– Iceland, Faeroes, Britain, Ireland, Helgoland, NW France

   

1

Cepphus grylle grylle

     

– Baltic Sea

 

1

 

Cepphus grylle mandtii

     

– Arctic E North America to Greenland, Jan Mayen & Svalbard E through Siberia to Alaska

 

1

 

Cepphus grylle arcticus

     

– N America, S Greenland, Britain, Ireland, Scandinavia, White Sea

   

1

Cepphus grylle islandicus

     

– Iceland

3c

   

Cepphus grylle faeroeensis

     

– Faeroes

1c

   

Fratercula arctica arctica

     

– Hudson bay & Maine E to S Greenland, Iceland, Bear Is, Norway to S Novaya Zemlya

   

1

Fratercula arctica naumanni

     

– NE Canada, N Greenland, to Jan Mayen, Svalbard, N Novaya Zemlya

3a

   

Fratercula arctica grabae

     

– Faeroes, S Norway & Sweden, Britain, Ireland, NW France

   

1


Résolution 5.6
Adoption d’amendements au plan d’action de l’aewa

Rappelant l’Article X de l’Accord concernant les procédures d’amendement de l’Accord et de ses annexes,

Rappelant également la Résolution 4.1 qui, entre autres, priait le Comité technique d’examiner, pour autant que les espèces d’oiseaux couvertes par l’Accord soient concernées, tout problème éventuel résultant de l’utilisation des poids de pêche en plomb,

Tenant compte des recommandations de L’étude documentaire sur les effets de l’utilisation de poids de pêche en plomb sur les oiseaux d’eau et les zones humides, qui a été préparée par le Secrétariat sur base intersessionnelle sur la demande du Comité technique (document AEWA/MOP Inf. 5.2),

Rappelant la Résolution 4.3 qui, entre autres, priait le Comité technique d’examiner les questions d’interprétation et les incidences du Plan d’action relatives à la chasse et au commerce comme spécifié à l’Annexe 1 de la même Résolution, et de donner des conseils à ce sujet,

Rappelant également la Résolution 4.11 qui, entre autres, demandait au Comité technique d’étudier les données ornithologiques sur la Sterne naine (Sterna albifrons) pour une meilleure description des populations méditerranéennes, tenant compte des informations pertinentes concernant la population nicheuse italienne et de rédiger une proposition d’amendement conséquente du Tableau 1, s’il y a lieu, à soumettre à la 5ème session de la Réunion des Parties; de réviser les définitions de termes géographiques utilisés dans la description des aires de répartition des populations dans le Tableau 1 et de rédiger une proposition d’amendement conséquente du Tableau 1, s’il y a lieu, à soumettre à la 5ème session de la Réunion des Parties; de réviser, à la lumière du développement de la terminologie utilisée par l’UICN pour les Listes rouges, en priorité l’applicabilité des critères de menace, en particulier la catégorie Quasi menacée de l’UICN, à la liste des populations figurant dans le Tableau 1 et de présenter des options pour l’amendement du Tableau 1 à examiner par la 5ème session de la Réunion des Parties; et de rédiger une proposition d’amendement du Plan d’action de l’AEWA concernant les effets des espèces aquatiques invasives non indigènes sur les habitats des oiseaux d’eau à soumettre à la 5ème session de la Réunion des Parties,

Rappelant également la Résolution 4.12 qui, entre autres, demandait au Comité technique, d’élaborer une directive destinée à interpréter l’expression «fluctuations extrêmes dans les tailles et les tendances des populations», employée dans le Tableau 1 du Plan d’action, en recourant si besoin et de façon appropriée à une aide extérieure, et dans la limite des ressources,

Reconnaissant le travail réalisé par le Comité technique au cours des quatre dernières années pour répondre à ces demandes,

Tenant compte des conclusions de la cinquième édition du Rapport sur l’État de conservation des oiseaux d’eau migrateurs dans la zone de l’Accord (document AEWA/MOP 5.14),

Reconnaissant les propositions d’amendement à l’Annexe 3 (Plan d’action et Tableau 1) soumises par le Kenya et les commentaires reçus des Parties contractantes concernant ces propositions, qui sont toutes présentées dans l’addendum Rév. 1 du document AEWA/MOP 5.20,

Reconnaissant l’intégration récente à la Liste rouge mondiale du Courlis cendré (Numenius arquata), de la Harelde boréale (Clangula hyemalis) et de la Macreuse brune (Melanitta fusca), et notant l’importance de considérer les implications de ces changements pour la MOP6.

La Réunion des Parties:

  • 1. Décide d’amender le Plan d’action à l’Annexe 3 de l’Accord comme énoncé dans les Appendices de la présente résolution;

  • 2. Décide, notamment:

    • 2.1. d’amender les paragraphes 2.1, 2.5, 3.3, 4.1 et 4.3 du Plan d’action avec le texte figurant à l’Appendice I de la présente résolution,

    • 2.2. de remplacer l’actuel Tableau 1 du Plan d’action et le texte explicatif associé par le Tableau et le texte explicatif énoncé à l’Appendice II de la présente résolution,

    • 2.3. de modifier le nom scientifique du Flamant nain en Phoeniconaias minor, le nom scientifique du Chevalier bargette en Xenus cinereus, et le nom scientifique du Chevalier guignette en Actitis hypoleucos dans l’Annexe 2 de l’Accord;

  • 3. Demande au Secrétariat de surveiller la mise en œuvre des amendements;

  • 4. Prie instamment les Parties contractantes à soutenir une surveillance coordonnée, des actions de recherche et de conservation, incluant des mesures de gestion adaptative, et d’appuyer le développement de plans d’action par espèce pour le Courlis cendré (Numenius arquata), la Harelde boréale (Clangula hyemalis) et la Macreuse brune (Melanitta fusca), avec pour priorité le plan concernant la Harelde boréale (Clangula hyemalis) durant la prochaine période intersession;

  • 5. Demande au Comité technique d’étudier les réponses possibles aux déclins observés à l’échelle régionale et concernant de multiples espèces, à travers une combinaison de mesures nationales et internationales appropriées;

  • 6. Demande au Comité technique de développer une ligne directrice simple qui permettra aux Parties contractantes de faire rapport à la MOP6 du savoir national concernant les plombs de pêche et les oiseaux d’eau et l’élimination progressive du plomb.

Appendice I

Annexe 3 Plan d’Action

[…]

  • 2. Conservation des espèces

    • 2.1 Mesures juridiques

      • 2.1.1 Les Parties ayant des populations figurant à la colonne A du tableau 1 du présent Plan d’action assurent la protection de ces populations conformément à l’Article III, paragraphe 2 (a), de l’Accord. En particulier, et sous réserve des dispositions du paragraphe 2.1.3 ci-dessous, ces Parties:

        • a) interdisent de prélever les oiseaux et les œufs de ces populations se trouvant sur leur territoire;

        • b) interdisent les perturbations intentionnelles, dans la mesure où ces perturbations seraient significatives pour la conservation de la population concernée; et

        • c) interdisent la détention, l’utilisation et le commerce des oiseaux de ces populations et de leurs œufs lorsqu’ils ont été prélevés en contravention aux interdictions établies en application de l’alinéa a) ci-dessus, ainsi que la détention, l’utilisation et le commerce de toute partie ou produit facilement identifiable de ces oiseaux et de leurs œufs.

        À titre d’exception pour les populations listées en catégories 2 et 3 de la colonne A et marquées par un astérisque, et pour les populations listées en catégorie 4 de la colonne A, la chasse peut continuer de manière durable1) . L’utilisation durable doit être menée dans le cadre d’un plan d’action international par espèce au travers duquel les Parties essaieront de mettre en œuvre les principes de gestion adaptative des prélèvements.2) Une telle utilisation doit au moins être sujette aux mêmes mesures juridiques que le prélèvement d’oiseaux de populations listées à la colonne B du tableau 1, tel que demandé au paragraphe 2.1.2 ci-dessous.

      • 2.1.2 Les Parties ayant des populations figurant au tableau 1 réglementent le prélèvement d’oiseaux et d’œufs de toutes les populations inscrites à la colonne B du tableau 1. L’objet de cette réglementation est de maintenir ou de contribuer à la restauration de ces populations en un état de conservation favorable et de s’assurer, sur la base des meilleures connaissances disponibles sur la dynamique des populations, que tout prélèvement ou toute autre utilisation de ces oiseaux ou de ces œufs est durable. Cette réglementation, en particulier, et sous réserve des dispositions du paragraphe 2.1.3 ci-dessous:

        • a) interdira le prélèvement des oiseaux appartenant aux populations concernées durant les différentes phases de la reproduction et de l’élevage des jeunes et pendant leur retour vers les lieux de reproduction, dans la mesure où ledit prélèvement a un effet défavorable sur l’état de conservation de la population concernée;

        • b) réglementera les modes de prélèvement et interdira notamment l’utilisation de tous les modes de prélèvement systématique et l’utilisation de tous les moyens capables d’engendrer des destructions massives, ainsi que la disparition locale ou des perturbations significatives des populations d’une espèce, incluant:

          • collets,

          • gluaux,

          • hameçons,

          • oiseaux vivants utilisés comme appelants aveuglés ou mutilés,

          • enregistreurs et autres appareils électroniques,

          • appareils électrocutants,

          • sources de lumière artificielle,

          • miroirs et autres dispositifs éblouissants,

          • dispositifs pour éclairer les cibles,

          • dispositifs de visée comportant un convertisseur d’image ou un amplificateur d’image électronique pour tir de nuit,

          • explosifs,

          • filets,

          • pièges-trappes,

          • poison,

          • appâts empoisonnés ou anesthésiants,

          • armes semi-automatiques ou automatiques dont le chargeur peut contenir plus de deux cartouches,

          • la chasse à partir d’avions, de véhicules à moteur ou de bateaux allant à une vitesse de plus de 5 km/heure (18 km/heure en haute mer).

          Les Parties peuvent accorder des dérogations aux interdictions établies au paragraphe 2.1.2 (b) pour permettre l’utilisation pour des besoins de subsistance, à condition que cette utilisation soit durable;

        • c) établira des limites de prélèvement, lorsque cela s’avère approprié, et instituera des contrôles adéquats afin de s’assurer que ces limites sont respectées; et

        • d) interdira la détention, l’utilisation et le commerce des oiseaux de ces populations et de leurs œufs lorsqu’ils ont été prélevés en violation des interdictions définies par les dispositions de ce paragraphe ainsi que la détention, l’utilisation et le commerce de toute partie ou produit facilement identifiable de ces oiseaux et de leurs œufs.

      • 2.1.3 Lorsqu’il n’y a pas d’autre solution satisfaisante, les Parties peuvent accorder des dérogations aux interdictions établies aux paragraphes 2.1.1 et 2.1.2 sans préjudice des dispositions de l’article III, paragraphe 5, de la Convention, pour les motifs ci-après:

        • a) pour prévenir les dommages importants aux cultures, aux eaux et aux pêcheries;

        • b) dans l’intérêt de la sécurité aérienne, de la santé et de la sécurité publique, ou pour d’autres raisons impératives d’intérêt public, y compris celles de nature sociale ou économique, ou ayant des conséquences bénéfiques primordiales pour l’environnement;

        • c) à des fins de recherche et d’enseignement, de rétablissement, ainsi que pour l’élevage nécessaire à ces fins;

        • d) pour permettre, dans des conditions strictement contrôlées, de manière sélective et dans une mesure limitée, le prélèvement et la détention ou toute autre utilisation judicieuse de certains oiseaux en petites quantités; et

        • e) dans le but d’améliorer la propagation ou la survie des populations concernées.

        Ces dérogations seront précises quant à leur contenu et limitées dans l’espace et dans le temps et ne s’opèreront pas au détriment des populations figurant au tableau 1. Les Parties informent dès que possible le secrétariat de l’Accord de toute dérogation accordée en vertu de cette disposition.

      […]

    • 2.5 Introductions

      • 2.5.1 Les Parties interdisent l’introduction dans l’environnement d’espèces animales et végétales non indigènes susceptibles de nuire aux populations d’oiseaux d’eau migrateurs figurant au tableau 1.

      • 2.5.2 Les Parties s’assurent que des précautions appropriées sont prises pour éviter que s’échappent accidentellement des animaux captifs appartenant à des espèces non indigènes pouvant être nuisibles aux populations figurant au tableau 1.

      • 2.5.3 Dans la mesure du possible et lorsque cela s’avère approprié, les Parties prennent des mesures, y compris des mesures de prélèvement, pour faire en sorte que, lorsque des espèces non indigènes ou leurs hybrides ont déjà été introduites dans leur territoire, ces espèces, ou leurs hybrides, ne constituent pas un danger potentiel pour les populations figurant au tableau 1.

    […]

  • 3. Conservation des habitats

    • 3.3 Réhabilitation et restauration

      Chaque fois que cela est possible et approprié, les Parties s’efforcent de réhabiliter et de restaurer les zones qui étaient précédemment importantes pour les populations figurant au tableau 1, qui incluent les zones ayant souffert de dégradations en résultat des impacts de facteurs tels que le changement climatique, le changement hydrologique, l’agriculture, la propagation d’espèces aquatiques exotiques envahissantes, la succession naturelle, des feux incontrôlés, l’utilisation non durable, l’eutrophisation et la pollution.

    […]

  • 4. Gestion des activités humaines

    • 4.1 Chasse

      • 4.1.1 Les Parties coopèrent pour faire en sorte que leur législation sur la chasse mette en œuvre le principe de l’utilisation durable comme le prévoit le présent Plan d’action, en tenant compte de la totalité de l’aire de répartition géographique des populations d’oiseaux d’eau concernées et des caractéristiques de leur cycle biologique.

      • 4.1.2 Le secrétariat de l’Accord est tenu informé par les Parties de leur législation sur la chasse des populations figurant au tableau 1.

      • 4.1.3 Les Parties coopèrent afin de développer un système fiable et harmonisé pour la collecte de données sur les prélèvements afin d’évaluer le prélèvement annuel effectué sur les populations figurant au tableau 1. Elles fournissent au secrétariat de l’Accord des estimations sur la totalité des prélèvements annuels pour chaque population, lorsque ces renseignements sont disponibles.

      • 4.1.4 Les Parties s’efforcent de supprimer l’utilisation de la grenaille de plomb de chasse dans les zones humides, dès que possible, conformément à des calendriers qu’elles se seront imposés et qu’elles auront publiés.

      • 4.1.5

      • 4.1.6 Les Parties élaborent et appliquent des mesures pour réduire et, dans la mesure du possible, éliminer les prélèvements illégaux.

      • 4.1.7 S’il y a lieu, les Parties encouragent les chasseurs, aux niveaux local, national et international, à former leurs propres associations ou organisations, afin de coordonner leurs activités et mettre en œuvre le concept d’utilisation durable.

      • 4.1.8 S’il y a lieu, les Parties encouragent l’exigence de tests de compétence pour les chasseurs, y compris, entre autres, d’identification des oiseaux.

    […]

    • 4.3 Autres activités humaines

      [...]

      • 4.3.4 Les Parties coopèrent afin d’élaborer des plans de gestion par espèce pour les populations qui causent des dommages significatifs, en particulier aux cultures et à la pêche. Le secrétariat de l’Accord coordonne l’élaboration et l’harmonisation de ces plans.

      […]

      • 4.3.12 Les Parties, le secrétariat de l’Accord et le Comité technique travailleront ensemble, le cas échéant, à fournir davantage d’éléments illustrant la nature et l’ampleur des effets des plombs de pêche sur les oiseaux d’eau et à prendre en compte ces éléments, en notant que le plomb, d’une manière générale, est une menace pour l’environnement avec des effets néfastes sur les oiseaux d’eau. Les Parties chercheront selon le cas des alternatives aux plombs de pêche, en prenant en compte leur impact sur les oiseaux d’eau et sur la qualité de l’eau.

Appendice II

Tableau 11) Etat des populations d’oiseaux d’eau migrateurs

Explication de la classification

La classification suivante constitue le fondement de la mise en œuvre du Plan d’action.

Colonne A

Catégorie 1:

  • a) Espèces figurant à l’annexe 1 de la Convention sur la conservation des espèces migratrices appartenant à la faune sauvage;

  • b) Espèces qui sont inscrites comme menacées dans la Liste rouge des espèces menacées de l’UICN, telles que répertoriées dans le plus récent résumé de BirdLife International; ou

  • c) Populations de moins de 10 000 individus.

Catégorie 2: Populations comptant approximativement entre 10 000 et 25 000 individus.

Catégorie 3: Populations comptant approximativement entre 25 000 et 100 000 individus et considérées comme menacées en raison de:

  • a) Leur concentration sur un petit nombre de sites à un stade ou l’autre de leur cycle annuel:

  • b) Leur dépendance par rapport à un type d’habitat gravement menacé;

  • c) Signes importants de leur déclin à long terme;

  • d) Vastes fluctuations de la taille de la population, ou tendances allant dans ce sens.

Catégorie 4: Les espèces figurant dans la catégorie Quasi menacée de la Liste rouge de l’UICN des espèces menacées, telles que répertoriées dans le plus récent résumé de BirdLife International, mais qui ne remplissent pas les conditions pour entrer dans les catégories 1, 2 ou 3 décrites ci-dessus et pour lesquelles une action internationale est appropriée.

Pour les espèces inscrites dans les catégories 2, 3 et 4 ci-dessus, voir le paragraphe 2.1.1 du Plan d’action contenu en annexe 3 de l’Accord.

Colonne B

Catégorie 1: Populations comptant approximativement entre 25 000 et 100 000 d’individus qui ne remplissent pas les conditions pour figurer dans la colonne A ci-dessus.

Catégorie 2: Populations comptant plus de 100 000 d’individus et considérées comme nécessitant une attention particulière en raison de:

  • a) Leur concentration sur un petit nombre de sites à un stade ou l’autre de leur cycle annuel;

  • b) Leur dépendance à l’égard d’un type d’habitat qui est gravement menacé;

  • c) Signes importants de leur déclin à long terme;

  • d) Vastes fluctuations de la taille de la population, ou tendances allant dans ce sens.

Colonne C

Catégorie 1: Populations comptant plus de 100 000 d’individus, ayant dans une grande mesure intérêt à bénéficier d’une coopération internationale et qui ne remplissent pas les conditions pour figurer dans les colonnes A ou B ci-dessus.

Examen du tableau 1

Le présent tableau sera:

  • a) Examiné régulièrement par le Comité technique conformément à l’article VII, paragraphe 3(b), du présent Accord; et

  • b) Amendé, s’il y a lieu, par la Réunion des Parties conformément à l’article VI, paragraphe 9(d), du présent Accord, à la lumière des conclusions de cet examen.

Definition de termes geographiques utilises dans la description des aires de repartition

Il est à noter que les aires de répartition des oiseaux d’eau connaissent des frontières biologiques mais non politiques et que la correspondance précise d’entités biologiques et politiques est extrêmement rare. Les descriptions des aires de répartition utilisées n’ont aucune signification politique et sont seulement données à titre d’indication générale. Pour des relevés concis et cartographiés des aires de répartition des oiseaux d’eau, se reporter à l’outil du Réseau de sites critiques à l’adresse suivante:

http://wow.wetlands.org/informationflyway/criticalsitenetworktool/tabid/1349/language/en-US/Default.aspx

Afrique du Nord

Algérie, Egypte, Lybie, Maroc, Tunisie.

   

Afrique de l’Ouest

Bénin, Burkina Faso, Cameroun, Cap-Vert, Côte d’Ivoire, Gambie, Ghana, Guinée, Guinée-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritanie, Niger, Nigeria, Sénégal, Sierra Leone, Tchad, Togo.

   

Afrique de l’Est

Burundi, Djibouti, Erythrée, Ethiopie, Kenya, Ouganda, Rwanda, Somalie, Soudan du Sud, Soudan, Tanzanie (République unie de).

   

Afrique du Nord-Ouest

Maroc, Algérie et Tunisie.

   

Afrique du Nord-Est

Djibouti, Egypte, Erythrée, Ethiopie, Somalie, Soudan du Sud, Soudan.

   

Afrique australe

Afrique du Sud, Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibie, Swaziland, Zambie, Zimbabwe.

   

Afrique centrale

Cameroun, Congo, Gabon, Guinée équatoriale, République centrafricaine, République démocratique du Congo, Sao Tomé et Principe.

   

Afrique sub-saharienne

Tous les Etats africains au sud du Sahara.

   

Afrique tropicale

Afrique sub-saharienne à l’exclusion du Lesotho, de la Namibie, de l’Afrique du Sud et du Swaziland.

   

Paléarctique occidental

Comme défini dans le manuel des oiseaux d’Europe, du Moyen-Orient et de l’Afrique du Nord (Cramp & Simmons 1977).

   

Europe du Nord-Ouest

Allemagne, Belgique, Danemark, Finlande, France, Irlande, Islande, Luxembourg, Norvège, Pays-Bas, Royaume-Uni de Grande Bretagne et d’Irlande du Nord, Suède.

   

Europe occidentale

Europe du Nord-Ouest avec le Portugal et l’Espagne.

   

Europe du Nord-Est

La partie septentrionale de la Fédération de Russie à l’ouest de l’Oural.

   

Europe du Nord

Europe du Nord-Ouest et Europe du Nord-Est, telles que définies ci-dessus.

   

Europe de l’Est

Bélarus, Fédération de Russie à l’ouest de l’Oural, Ukraine.

   

Europe centrale

Allemagne, Autriche, Estonie, Fédération de Russie autour du golfe de Finlande et de Kaliningrad, Hongrie, Lettonie, Liechtenstein, Lituanie, Pologne, République tchèque, Slovaquie, Suisse.

   

Europe du Sud-Ouest

Espagne, France méditerranéenne, Italie, Malte, Portugal, Saint-Marin.

   

Europe du Sud-Est

Albanie, Arménie, Bosnie-Herzégovine, Bulgarie, Chypre, Croatie, Géorgie Grèce, Ex-République yougoslave de Macédoine, République de Moldavie, Monténégro, Roumanie, Serbie, Slovénie et Turquie.

   

Europe du Sud

Europe du Sud-Ouest et Europe du Sud-Est, telles que définies ci-dessus.

   

Atlantique Nord

Côte Nord-Ouest de la Fédération de Russie, îles Féroé, Groenland, Irlande, Islande, Norvège, Royaume-Uni de Grande Bretagne et d’Irlande du Nord, Svalbard.

   

Atlantique Est

Rivage européen de l’Atlantique et de l’Afrique du Nord, du nord de la Norvège au Maroc.

   

Sibérie occidentale

Fédération de Russie à l’est de l’Oural jusqu’au fleuve Ienissei et au sud de la frontière du Kazakhstan.

   

Sibérie centrale

Fédération de Russie du fleuve Ienisseï jusqu’à la frontière orientale de la péninsule de Taïmyr et au sud de l’Altaï.

   

Méditerranée occidentale

Algérie, Espagne, France, Italie, Malte, Maroc, Monaco, Portugal, Saint-Marin, Tunisie.

   

Méditerranée orientale

Albanie, Bosnie et Herzégovine, Chypre, Croatie, Egypte, Grèce, Israël, Libye, Liban, Ex-République yougoslave de Macédoine, Monténégro, République arabe syrienne, Serbie, Slovénie, Turquie, Yougoslavie.

   

Mer Noire

Arménie, Bulgarie, Fédération de Russie, Géorgie, République de Moldavie, Roumanie, Turquie, Ukraine.

   

Mer Caspienne

Azerbaïdjan, Kazakhstan, Ouzbékistan, République islamique d’Iran, Sud-Ouest de la Fédération de Russie, Turkménistan.

   

Asie du Sud-Ouest

Arabie Saoudite, Bahreïn, Emirats arabes unis, Irak, Israël, Jordanie, Kazakhstan, Koweït, Liban, Oman, Ouzbékistan, Qatar, République arabe syrienne, République islamique d’Iran, Turkménistan, Turquie orientale, Yémen.

   

Golfe

Le golfe Persique, le golfe d’Oman et la mer d’Oman à l’Ouest du golfe d’Aden.

   

Asie occidentale

Partie occidentale de la Fédération de Russie à l’est de l’Oural et des pays de la mer Caspienne.

   

Asie centrale

Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Kirghizistan, Ouzbékistan, Tadjikistan, Turkménistan.

   

Asie du Sud

Bangladesh, Bhoutan, Inde, Maldives, Népal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka.

   

Océan Indien

Comores, Madagascar, Maurice, Seychelles.

Liste des abreviations et symboles

rep.

population reproductrice

hiv.

population hivernante

N:

nord

E:

est

S:

sud

O:

ouest

NE:

nord-est

NO:

nord-ouest

SE:

sud-est

SO:

sud-ouest

(): État de conservation de la population inconnu. Etat de conservation estimé.

*: A titre exceptionnel, les populations figurant dans les catégories 2 et 3 de la colonne A et marquées d’un astérisque, peuvent continuer à être chassées sur une base durable. Cette utilisation durable doit trouver place dans le cadre des dispositions spéciales d’un plan d’action international par espèce, qui devra chercher à mettre en œuvre les principes de gestion adaptative des prélèvements (voir le paragraphe 2.1.2 de l’annexe 3 de l’Accord).

Remarques
  • 1. Les données relatives aux populations utilisées dans le tableau 1 correspondent, dans la mesure du possible, au nombre d’individus de la population reproductrice potentielle, dans la zone de l’Accord. L’état de conservation est établi à partir des meilleures estimations de populations disponibles et publiées.

  • 2. Les abréviations (rep) ou (hiv) utilisées dans le tableau servent uniquement aux fins d’identification des populations. Elles n’indiquent pas de restrictions saisonnières aux actions menées au regard de ces populations dans le cadre de l’Accord et du Plan d’action.

  • 3. Les descriptions brèves utilisées pour l’identification des populations reproduisent celles de l’édition la plus récente de Waterbird Population Estimates.

  • 4. Les barres obliques (/) qui sont employées séparent les zones de reproduction des zones d’hivernage.

  • 5. Lorsque la population d’une espèce figure au tableau 1 sous plusieurs catégories, les obligations à prendre en compte au titre du Plan d’action sont celles qui découlent de la catégorie la plus stricte.

 

A

B

C

       

SPHENISCIDAE

     

Spheniscus demersus

     

– Afrique australe

1b

2a 2c

 
       

GAVIIDAE

     

Gavia stellata

     

– Europe du Nord-Ouest (hiv)

 

2c

 

– Mer Caspienne, mer Noire & Méditerranée orientale (hiv)

1c

   

Gavia arctica arctica

     

– Europe du Nord & Sibérie occidentale/Europe

 

2c

 

Gavia arctica suschkini

     

– Sibérie centrale/mer Caspienne

   

(1)

Gavia immer

     

– Europe (hiv)

1c

   

Gavia adamsii

     

– Europe du Nord (hiv)

1c

   
       

PODICIPEDIDAE

     

Tachybaptus ruficollis ruficollis

     

– Europe & Afrique du Nord-Ouest

   

1

Podiceps cristatus cristatus

     

– Europe du Nord-Ouest et occidentale

 

2c

 

– Mer Noire & Méditerranée (hiv)

 

2c

 

– Mer Caspienne & Asie du Sud-Ouest (hiv)

2

   

Podiceps cristatus infuscatus

     

– Afrique de l’Est (Éthiopie au N de la Zambie)

1c

   

– Afrique australe

1c

   

Podiceps grisegena grisegena

     

– Europe du Nord-Ouest (hiv)

3c

   

– Mer Noire & Méditerranée (hiv)

3c

   

– Mer Caspienne (hiv)

2

   

Podiceps auritus auritus

     

– Europe du Nord-Ouest (grand bec)

1c

   

– Europe du Nord-Est (petit bec)

2

   

– Mer Caspienne & Asie du Sud (hiv)

2

   

Podiceps nigricollis nigricollis

     

– Europe/Europe du Sud & occidentale & Afrique du Nord

 

2c

 

– Asie de l’Ouest/Asie du Sud-Ouest & du Sud

 

1

 

Podiceps nigricollis gurneyi

     

– Afrique australe

2

   
       

PHAETHONTIDAE

     

Phaethon aetherus aetherus

     

– Atlantique Sud

1c

   

Phaethon aetherus indicus

     

– Golfe Persique, golfe d’Aden, mer Rouge

1c

   

Phaethon rubricauda rubricauda

     

– Océan Indien

2

   

Phaethon lepturus lepturus

     

– O Océan Indien

2

   
       

PELECANIDAE

     

Pelecanus onocrotalus

     

– Afrique australe

 

1

 

– Afrique de l’Ouest

 

1

 

– Afrique de l’Est

   

1

– Europe & Asie de l’Ouest (rep)

1a 3c

   

Pelecanus rufescens

     

– Afrique tropicale & Sud-Ouest de l’Arabie

 

1

 

Pelecanus crispus

     

– Mer Noire & Méditerranée (hiv)

1a 1b 1c

   

– Asie du Sud-Ouest & Asie du Sud (hiv)

1a 1b 1c

   
       

SULIDAE

     

Sula (Morus) bassana

   

1

Sula (Morus) capensis

     

– Afrique australe

1b

2a 2c

 

Sula dactylatramelanops

     

– O Océan Indien

2

   
       

PHALACROCORACIDAE

     

Phalacrocorax coronatus

     

– Littoral de l’Afrique du Sud-Ouest

1c

   

Phalacrocorax pygmeus

     

– Mer Noire & Méditerranée

 

1

 

– Asie du Sud-Ouest

 

1

 

Phalacrocorax neglectus

     

– Littoral de l’Afrique du Sud-Ouest

1b 2

   

Phalacrocorax carbo carbo

     

– Europe du Nord-Ouest

   

1

Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis

     

– Europe du Nord & Europe centrale

   

1

– Mer Noire & Méditerranée

   

1

Asie de l’Ouest & du Sud-Ouest

   

(1)

Phalacrocorax carbo lucidus

     

– Littoral de l’Afrique de l’Ouest

 

1

 

– Afrique centrale & de l’Est

   

1

– Littoral de l’Afrique australe

2

   

Phalacrocorax nigrogularis

     

– Côtes de l’Arabie

1b

2a 2c

 

– Golfe d’Aden, Socotra, mer d’Oman

1b

1

 

Phalacrocorax capensis

     

– Littoral de l’Afrique australe

4

   
       

FREGATIDAE

     

Fregata minor aldabrensis

     

– O Océan Indien

2

   

Fregata ariel iredalei

     

– O Océan Indien

2

   
       

ARDEIDAE

     

Egretta ardesiaca

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne

 

1

 

Egretta vinaceigula

     

– Afrique australe et centrale

1b 1c

   

Egretta garzetta garzetta

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne

   

(1)

– Europe occidentale, NO Afrique

   

1

– Europe centrale & E Europe, mer Noire, E Méditerranée

 

1

 

– Asie de l’Ouest/SO Asie & NE Afrique & Afrique de l’Est

 

(1)

 

Egretta gularis gularis

     

– Afrique de l’Ouest

 

(1)

 

Egretta gularis schistacea

     

– Afrique du Nord-Est & mer Rouge

 

(1)

 

– Asie du Sud-Ouest & Asie du Sud

2

   

Egretta dimorpha

     

– Littoral de l’Afrique de l’Est

2

   

Ardea cinerea cinerea

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne

   

1

– Europe du Nord & occidentale

   

1

– Europe centrale & de l’Est

   

1

– Asie de l’Ouest & du Sud-Ouest (rep)

   

(1)

Ardea melanocephala

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne

   

(1)

Ardea purpurea purpurea

     

– Afrique tropicale

 

1

 

– Europe occidentale & Méditerranée occidentale/Afrique de l’Ouest

2

   

– Europe de l’Est, Mer Noire & Méditerranée/Afrique sub-saharienne

 

(2c)

 

Casmerodius albus albus

     

– O, C & SE Europe/Mer Noire & Méditerranée

 

1

 

– Asie de l’Ouest/Asie du Sud-Ouest

 

(1)

 

Casmerodius albus melanorhynchos

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne & Madagascar

   

(1)

Mesophoyx intermedia brachyrhyncha

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne

 

1

 

Bubulcus ibis ibis

     

– Afrique australe

   

1

– Afrique tropicale

   

1

– Europe du Sud-Ouest

   

1

– Afrique du Nord-Ouest

   

1

– Méditerranée orientale & Asie du Sud-Ouest

 

1

 

Ardeola ralloides ralloides

     

– SO Europe, NO Afrique (rep)

1c

   

– C & E Europe/mer Noire & E Méditerranée (rep)

 

1

 

– Asie de l’Ouest & du Sud-Ouest/Afrique sub-saharienne

 

(1)

 

Ardeola ralloides paludivaga

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne & Madagascar

   

(1)

Ardeola idae

     

– Madagascar & Aldabra/Afrique centrale & de l’Est

1b 1c

   

Ardeola rufiventris

     

– Afrique tropicale Est & australe

 

(1)

 

Nycticorax nycticorax nycticorax

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne & Madagascar

   

1

– O Europe, NO Afrique (rep)

3c

   

– C & E Europe/mer Noire & E Méditerranée (rep)

 

2c

 

– Asie de l’Ouest/SO Asie & NE Afrique

 

(1)

 

Ixobrychus minutus minutus

     

– O Europe, NO Afrique/Afrique sub-saharienne

2

   

– C & E Europe, mer Noire & E Méditerranée/Afrique sub-saharienne

 

2c

 

– Asie de l’Ouest & du Sud-Ouest/Afrique sub-saharienne

 

(1)

 

Ixobrychus minutus payesii

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne

 

(1)

 

Ixobrychus sturmii

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne

 

(1)

 

Botaurus stellaris stellaris

     

– O Europe, NO Afrique (rep)

1c

   

– C & E Europe/mer Noire & E Méditerranée (rep)

 

2c

 

– Asie du Sud-Ouest (hiv)

 

1

 

Botaurus stellaris capensis

     

– Afrique australe

1c

   
       

CICONIIDAE

     

Mycteria ibis

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne (non compris Madagascar)

 

1

 

Anastomus lamelligerus lamelligerus

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne

   

1

Ciconia nigra

     

– Afrique australe

1c

   

– Europe du Sud-Ouest/Afrique de l’Ouest

1c

   

– Europe centrale & de l’Est/Afrique sub-saharienne

2

   

Ciconia abdimii

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne & SO Arabie

 

(2c)

 

Ciconia episcopus microscelis

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne

 

(1)

 

Ciconia ciconia ciconia

     

– Afrique australe

1c

   

– O Europe & Afrique du Nord-Ouest/Afrique sub-saharienne

3b

   

– Europe centrale & de l’Est/Afrique sub-saharienne

   

1

– Asie de l’Ouest/Asie du Sud-Ouest

2

   

Leptoptilos crumeniferus

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne

   

1

       

BALAENICIPITIDAE

     

Balaeniceps rex

     

– Afrique tropicale centrale

1b 1c

   
       

THRESKIORNITHIDAE

     

Plegadis falcinellus falcinellus

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne (rep)

   

1

– Mer Noire & Méditerranée/Afrique de l’Ouest

3c

   

– Asie du Sud-Ouest/Afrique de l’Est

 

(1)

 

Geronticus eremita

     

– Maroc

1a 1b 1c

   

– Asie du Sud-Ouest

1a 1b 1c

   

Threskiornis aethiopicus aethiopicus

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne

   

1

– Irak & Iran

1c

   

Platalea leucorodia leucorodia

     

– Europe occidentale/Méditerranée occidentale & Afrique de l’Ouest

2

   

– Europe centrale & SE Europe/Méditerranée & Afrique tropicale

2

   

Platalea leucorodia archeri

     

– Mer Rouge & Somalie

1c

   

Platalea leucorodia balsaci

     

– Littoral de l’Afrique de l’Ouest (Mauritanie)

1c

   

Platalea leucorodia major

     

– Asie de l’Ouest/Asie du Sud-Ouest & du Sud

2

   

Platalea alba

     

– Afrique sub-saharienne

 

1

 
       

PHOENICOPTERIDAE

     

Phoenicopterus roseus

     

– Afrique de l’Ouest

3a

   

– Afrique de l’Est

3a

   

– Afrique australe (à Madagascar)

3a

   

– Méditerranée occidentale

 

2a

 

– Méditerranée orientale

3a

   

– Asie du Sud-Ouest & du Sud

 

2a

 

Phoeniconaias minor

     

– Afrique de l’Ouest

2

   

– Afrique de l’Est

4

   

– Afrique australe (à Madagascar)

3a

   
       

ANATIDAE

     

Dendrocygna bicolor

     

– Afrique de l’Ouest (Sénégal au Tchad)

2

   

– Afrique de l’Est & Afrique australe

   

(1)

Dendrocygna viduata

     

– Afrique de l’Ouest (Sénégal au Tchad)

   

1

– Afrique de l’Est & Afrique australe

   

1

Thalassornis leuconotus leuconotus

     

– Afrique de l’Ouest

1c

   

– Afrique de l’Est & Afrique australe

2*

   

Oxyura leucocephala

     

– Méditerranée occidentale (Espagne & Maroc)

1a 1b 1c

   

– Algérie & Tunisie

1a 1b 1c

   

– Méditerranée orientale, Turquie & Asie du Sud-Ouest

1a 1b 1c

   

Oxyura maccoa

     

– Afrique de l’Est

1c

   

– Afrique australe

1c

   

Cygnus olor

     

– Nord-Ouest du continent & Europe centrale

   

1

– Mer Noire

 

1

 

– Asie de l’Ouest & Asie centrale/mer Caspienne

 

2a 2d

 

Cygnus cygnus

     

– Islande/R-U & Irlande

2

   

– Nord-Ouest du continent européen

 

1

 

– N Europe & O Sibérie/mer Noire & E méditerranéen

2

   

– Sibérie occidentale & centrale/mer Caspienne

2

   

Cygnus columbianus bewickii

     

– Sibérie occidentale & NE Europe/Europe du Nord-Ouest

2

   

– Sibérie du Nord/mer Caspienne

1c

   

Anser brachyrhynchus

     

– Groenland de l’Est & Islande/R-U

 

2a

 

– Svalbard/Europe du Nord-Ouest

 

1

 

Anser fabalis fabalis

     

– Europe du Nord-Est/Europe du Nord-Ouest

3c*

   

– Sibérie occidentale et centrale/Turkménistan à l’Ouest de la Chine

1c

   

Anser fabalis rossicus

     

– Sibérie occidentale & centrale/NE & SO Europe

   

(1)

Anser albifrons albifrons

     

– NO Sibérie & NE Europe/Europe du Nord-Ouest

   

1

– Sibérie occidentale/Europe centrale

   

1

– Sibérie occidentale/mer Noire & Turquie

   

1

– Sibérie du Nord/mer Caspienne & Irak

2

   

Anser albifrons flavirostris

     

– Groenland/Irlande & R-U

2*

   

Anser erythropus

     

– NE Europe & O Sibérie/mer Noire & mer Caspienne

1a 1b 2

   

– Fennoscandie

1a 1b 1c

   

Anser anser anser

     

– Islande/R-U & Irlande

 

1

 

– NO Europe/Europe du Sud-Ouest

   

1

– Europe centrale/Afrique du Nord

 

1

 

Anser anser rubrirostris

     

– Mer Noire & Turquie

 

1

 

– Sibérie occidentale/mer Caspienne & Irak

   

1

Branta leucopsis

     

– Groenland de l’Est/Ecosse & Irlande

 

1

 

– Svalbard/Ecosse du Sud-Ouest

3a

   

– Russie/Allemagne & Pays-Bas

   

1

Branta bernicla bernicla

     

– Sibérie occidentale/Europe occidentale

 

2b

 

Branta bernicla hrota

     

– Svalbard, Danemark & R-U

1c

   

– Canada & Groenland/Irlande

3a

   

Branta ruficollis

     

– Sibérie du Nord/mer Noire & mer Caspienne

1a 1b 3a 3c

   

Alopochen aegyptiacus

     

– Afrique de l’Ouest

1c

   

– Afrique de l’Est & Afrique australe

   

1

Tadorna ferruginea

     

– Afrique du Nord-Ouest

1c

   

– Méditerranée orientale & mer Noire/Afrique du Nord-Est

2

   

– Asie de l’Ouest & mer Caspienne/Iran & Irak

 

1

 

Tadorna cana

     

– Afrique australe

3c

   

Tadorna tadorna

     

– Europe du Nord-Ouest

 

2a

 

– Mer Noire & Méditerranée

   

1

– Asie de l’Ouest/mer Caspienne & Moyen-Orient

 

1

 

Plectropterus gambensis gambensis

     

– Afrique de l’Ouest

 

1

 

– Afrique de l’Est (Soudan à la Zambie)

   

1

Plectropterus gambensis niger

     

– Afrique australe

 

1

 

Sarkidiornis melanotos melanotos

     

– Afrique de l’Ouest

 

1

 

– Afrique australe & Afrique de l’Est

   

1

Nettapus auritus

     

– Afrique de l’Ouest

1c

   

– Afrique australe & Afrique de l’Est

   

(1)

Anas capensis

     

– Afrique de l’Est (Vallée du Rift)

1c

   

– Bassin du lac Tchad2

1c

   

– Afrique australe (N à l’Angola & Zambie)

   

1

Anas strepera strepera

     

– Europe du Nord-Ouest

 

1

 

– Europe du Nord-Est/mer Noire & Méditerranée

   

1

– Sibérie occidentale/SO Asie & NE Afrique

   

(1)

Anas penelope

     

– Sibérie occidentale & NE Europe/NO Europe

   

1

– O Sibérie & NE Europe/mer Noire & Méditerranée

   

1

– Sibérie occidentale/SO Asie & NE Afrique

 

2c

 

Anas platyrhynchos platyrhynchos

     

– Europe du Nord-Ouest

   

1

– Europe du Nord/ Méditerranée occidentale

   

1

– Europe de l’Est/mer Noire & Méditerranée orientale