Tractatenblad van het Koninkrijk der Nederlanden

Datum publicatieOrganisatieJaargang en nummerRubriekDatum totstandkoming
Ministerie van Buitenlandse ZakenTractatenblad 2013, 70Verdrag

72 (1999) Nr. 6

A. TITEL

Protocol bij het Verdrag van 1979 betreffende grensoverschrijdende luchtverontreiniging over lange afstand inzake vermindering van verzuring, eutrofiëring en ozon op leefniveau;

(met bijlagen)

Göteborg, 30 november 1999

B. TEKST

De Engelse en de Franse tekst van het Protocol, met bijlagen, zijn geplaatst in Trb. 2000, 66.

Voor de Engelse tekst van de besluiten van 4 mei 2012 tot wijziging van bijlage I bij het Protocol, tot wijziging van de tekst van het Protocol en de bijlagen II tot en met IX bij het Protocol en tot toevoeging van de nieuwe bijlagen X en XI, zie Trb. 2012, 246.

De in dat Tractatenblad opgenomen Engelse1) tekst van de besluiten dient te worden vervangen door de volgende tekst.


Amendment of annex I to the 1999 Protocol to Abate Acidification, Eutrophication and Ground-level Ozone

The Parties to the 1999 Protocol to Abate Acidification, Eutrophication and Ground-level Ozone, meeting within the thirtieth session of the Executive Body,

Decide to amend annex I to the 1999 Protocol to Abate Acidification, Eutrophication and Ground-level Ozone (Gothenburg Protocol) to the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution as follows:

Article 1 Amendment of annex I

1. In paragraph 1:

a) The words “Manual on methodologies and criteria for mapping critical levels/loads and geographical areas where they are exceeded” are replaced by the words “Manual on Methodologies and Criteria for Modelling and Mapping Critical Loads and Levels and Air Pollution Effects, Risks and Trends”;

b) The words “do not” at the end of the fourth sentence are replaced by the words “are loads that – in the long term – will not cause adverse effects to the structure and functions of ecosystems”;

c) The words “, such as uptake by vegetation” are added at the end of the fifth sentence;

d) The words “, and approved by the Executive Body,” are added after the word “Parties” in the final sentence; and

e) The word “ceilings” in the final sentence is replaced by the words “reduction commitments”.

2. For paragraph 2 the following text is substituted:

  • 2. In Canada, critical acid deposition loads and geographical areas where they are exceeded are determined and mapped for lakes and upland forest ecosystems using scientific methodologies and criteria similar to those in the Convention’s Manual on Methodologies and Criteria for Modelling and Mapping Critical Loads and Levels and Air Pollution Effects, Risks and Trends. Critical load values for total sulphur plus nitrogen and exceedance levels have been mapped across Canada (south of 60° N latitude) and are expressed in acid equivalents per hectare per year (eq/ha/yr) (2004 Canadian Acid Deposition Science Assessment; 2008 Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment). The province of Alberta has also adapted the generic critical load classification systems used for soils in Europe for potential acidity to define soils as highly sensitive, moderately sensitive and not sensitive to acidic deposition. Critical, target and monitoring loads are defined for each soil class and management actions are prescribed as per the Alberta Acid Deposition Management Framework, as appropriate.

3. For paragraph 3, the following text is substituted:

  • 3. These loads and effects are used in integrated assessment activities, including providing data for international efforts to assess ecosystem response to loading of acidifying compounds, and provide guidance for setting the emission reduction commitments for Canada in annex II.

4. For paragraph 4, the following text is substituted:

  • 4. For the United States of America, the effects of acidification are evaluated through an assessment of the sensitivity and response of ecosystems to the loading of acidifying compounds, using peer-reviewed scientific methodologies and criteria, and accounting for the uncertainties associated with nitrogen cycling processes within ecosystems. Adverse impacts on vegetation and ecosystems are then considered in establishing secondary national ambient air quality standards for NOx and SO2. Integrated assessment modelling and the air quality standards are used in providing guidance for setting the emission reduction commitments for the United States of America in annex II.

5. In the heading before paragraph 5, “A.” is inserted before the words “For Parties within the geographical scope of EMEP”.

6. In paragraph 5:

a) The words “Manual on methodologies and criteria for mapping critical levels/loads and geographical areas where they are exceeded” are replaced by the words “Manual on Methodologies and Criteria for Modelling and Mapping Critical Loads and Levels and Air Pollution Effects, Risks and Trends”;

b) The words “an ecosystem can tolerate in the long term without being damaged” are replaced by the words “that – in the long term – will not cause adverse effects to the structure and functions of ecosystems”; and

c) The word “ceilings” in the final sentence is replaced by the words “reduction commitments”.

7. A new Part B and paragraph 5 bis are added as follows:

B. For Parties in North America

  • 5 bis. For the United States of America, the effects of nutrient nitrogen (eutrophication) for ecosystems are evaluated through an assessment of the sensitivity and response of ecosystems to the loading of nitrogen compounds, using peer-reviewed scientific methodologies and criteria, and accounting for uncertainties associated with nitrogen cycling within ecosystems. Adverse impacts on vegetation and ecosystems are then considered in establishing secondary national ambient air quality standards for NOx. Integrated assessment modelling and the air quality standards are used in providing guidance for setting the emission reduction commitments for the United States of America in annex II.

8. For paragraphs 6, 7 and 8 the following text is substituted:

  • 6. Critical levels (as defined in article 1) of ozone are determined to protect plants in accordance with the Convention’s Manual on Methodologies and Criteria for Modelling and Mapping Critical Loads and Levels and Air Pollution Effects, Risks and Trends. They are expressed in terms of the cumulative value of either stomatal fluxes or concentrations at the top of the canopy. Critical levels are preferably based on stomatal fluxes, as these are considered more biologically relevant since they take into account the modifying effect of climate, soil and plant factors on the uptake of ozone by vegetation.

  • 7. Critical levels of ozone have been derived for a number of species of crops, (semi-)natural vegetation and forest trees. The critical levels selected are related to the most important environmental effects, e.g., loss of security of food supplies, loss of carbon storage in the living biomass of trees and additional adverse effects on forest and (semi-)natural ecosystems.

  • 8. The critical level of ozone for human health is determined in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) air quality guidelines to protect human health from a wide range of health effects, including increased risk of premature death and morbidity.

9. For paragraph 9 the following text is substituted:

  • 9. For Canada, it is understood that there is no lower threshold for human health effects from ozone. That is, adverse effects have been observed at all ozone concentrations experienced in Canada. The Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone was set to aid management efforts nationally, and by jurisdictions, to significantly reduce the effects on human health and the environment.

10. In paragraph 10:

a) The words “of ozone are determined” are replaced by the words “are established in the form of primary and secondary national ambient air quality standards for ozone in order”;

b) The comma after the word “safety” is replaced by the word “and”;

c) The words “, including vegetation,” are inserted after the word “welfare”;

d) The words “, and are used to establish a national ambient air quality standard” at the end of the first sentence are deleted;

e) The word “standard” in the last sentence is replaced by the word “standards”; and

f) The words “ceilings and/or reductions” in the final sentence are replaced by the words “reduction commitments”.

11. New sections IV, V and VI are added as follows:

IV. Critical levels of particulate matter

A. For Parties in the geographical scope of EMEP

  • 11. The critical level of PM for human health is determined in accordance with the WHO air quality guidelines as the mass concentration of PM2.5. Attainment of the guideline level is expected to effectively reduce health risks. The long-term PM2.5 concentration, expressed as an annual average, is proportional to the risk to health, including reduction of life expectancy. This indicator is used in integrated modelling to provide guidance for emission reduction. In addition to the annual guideline level, a short-term (24-hour mean) guideline level is defined to protect against peaks of pollution which have significant impact on morbidity or mortality.

B. For Parties in North America

  • 12. For Canada, it is understood that there is no lower threshold for human health effects from PM. That is, adverse effects have been observed at all concentrations of PM experienced in Canada. The Canadian national standard for PM was set to aid management efforts nationally, and by jurisdictions, to significantly reduce the effects on human health and the environment.

  • 13. For the United States of America, critical levels are established in the form of primary and secondary national ambient air quality standards for PM in order to protect public health with an adequate margin of safety, and to protect public welfare (including visibility and man-made materials) from any known or expected adverse effects. Integrated assessment modelling and the air quality standards are used in providing guidance for setting the emission reduction commitments for the United States of America in annex II.

V. Critical levels of ammonia
  • 14. Critical levels (as defined in article 1) of ammonia are determined to protect plants in accordance with the Convention’s Manual on Methodologies and Criteria for Modelling and Mapping Critical Loads and Levels and Air Pollution Effects, Risks and Trends.

VI. Acceptable levels of air pollutants to protect materials
  • 15. Acceptable levels of acidifying pollutants, ozone and PM are determined to protect materials and cultural heritage in accordance with the Convention’s Manual on Methodologies and Criteria for Modelling and Mapping Critical Loads and Levels and Air Pollution Effects, Risks and Trends. The acceptable levels of pollutants are the maximum exposure a material can tolerate in the long term without resulting in damage above specified target corrosion rates. This damage, which can be calculated by available dose-response functions, is the result of several pollutants acting together in different combinations depending on the material: acidity (sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitric acid (HNO3)), ozone and PM.

Article 2 Entry Into Force

  • 12. In accordance with article 13, paragraph 4, of the Protocol, this amendment shall become effective for those Parties which have not submitted a notification to the Depositary in accordance with article 13, paragraph 5, of the Protocol on the expiry of ninety days from the date of its communication to all Parties by the Executive Secretary of the Commission, provided that at least sixteen Parties have not submitted such a notification.



Amendment of the text of and annexes II to IX to the 1999 Protocol to Abate Acidification, Eutrophication and Ground-level Ozone and the addition of new annexes X and XI

Article 1 Amendment

The Parties to the 1999 Protocol to Abate Acidification, Eutrophication and Ground-level Ozone, meeting within the thirtieth session of the Executive Body,

Decide to amend the 1999 Protocol to Abate Acidification, Eutrophication and Ground-level Ozone (Gothenburg Protocol) to the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution as set out in the annex to this decision.

Article 2 Relationship to the Gothenburg Protocol

No State or regional economic integration organization may deposit an instrument of acceptance of this Amendment unless it has previously, or simultaneously, deposited an instrument of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession to the Gothenburg Protocol.

Article 3 Entry into force

In accordance with article 13, paragraph 3, of the Gothenburg Protocol, this Amendment shall enter into force on the ninetieth day after the date on which two thirds of the Parties to the Gothenburg Protocol have deposited with the Depositary their instruments of acceptance thereof.

Annex

A.

Preamble

1. In the second preambular paragraph, the words “volatile organic compounds and reduced nitrogen compounds” are replaced by the words “volatile organic compounds, reduced nitrogen compounds and particulate matter”.

2. In the third preambular paragraph, the words “and particulate matter” are inserted after the word “ozone”.

3. In the fourth preambular paragraph, the words “sulphur and volatile organic compounds, as well as secondary pollutants such as ozone” are replaced by the words “sulphur, volatile organic compounds, ammonia and directly emitted particulate matter, as well as secondarily formed pollutants such as ozone, particulate matter”.

4. The following preambular paragraph is added between the fourth and fifth preambular paragraphs:

Recognizing the assessments of scientific knowledge by international organizations, such as the United Nations Environment Programme, and by the Arctic Council, about the human health and climate co-benefits of reducing black carbon and ground-level ozone, particularly in the Arctic and in the Alpine regions,”.

5. For the sixth preambular paragraph there is substituted:

Recognizing also that Canada and the United States of America are bilaterally addressing cross-border air pollution under the Canada – United States Air Quality Agreement, which includes commitments by both countries to reduce emissions of sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds, and that the two countries are considering the inclusion of commitments to reduce emissions of particulate matter,

6. For the seventh preambular paragraph there is substituted:

Recognizing furthermore that Canada is committed to achieving reductions of sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter to meet the Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone and particulate matter and the national objective to reduce acidification, and that the United States is committed to the implementation of programmes to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter necessary to meet national ambient air quality standards for ozone and particulate matter, to make continued progress in reducing acidification and eutrophication effects and to improve visibility in national parks and urban areas alike,

7. The ninth and tenth preambular paragraphs are replaced by the following preambular paragraphs:

Taking into account the scientific knowledge about the hemispheric transport of air pollution, the influence of the nitrogen cycle and the potential synergies with and trade-offs between air pollution and climate change, Aware that emissions from shipping and aviation contribute significantly to adverse effects on human health and the environment and are important issues under consideration by the International Maritime Organization and the International Civil Aviation Organization,”.

8. In the fifteenth preambular paragraph, the words “ammonia and volatile organic compounds” are replaced by the words “ammonia, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter”.

9. In the nineteenth preambular paragraph, the words “and particulate matter, including black carbon,” are inserted after the words “nitrogen compounds”.

10. The twentieth and twenty-first preambular paragraphs are deleted.

11. In the twenty-second preambular paragraph:

a) The words “and ammonia” are replaced by the words “and reduced nitrogen compounds”; and

b) The words “including nitrous oxide” are replaced by the words “, including nitrous oxide and nitrate levels in ecosystems,”.

12. In the twenty-third preambular paragraph, the word “tropospheric” is replaced by the words “ground-level”.

B.

Article 1

1. The following paragraph is added after paragraph 1:

  • 1 bis. The terms “this Protocol”, “the Protocol” and “the present Protocol” mean the 1999 Protocol to Abate Acidification, Eutrophication and Ground-Level Ozone, as amended from time to time;

2. The words “, expressed as ammonia (NH3)” are added at the end of paragraph 9.

3. The following paragraphs are added after paragraph 11:

  • 11 bis. “Particulate matter” or “PM” is an air pollutant consisting of a mixture of particles suspended in the air. These particles differ in their physical properties (such as size and shape) and chemical composition. Unless otherwise stated, all references to particulate matter in the present Protocol refer to particles with an aerodynamic diameter equal to or less than 10 microns (μm) (PM10), including those with an aerodynamic diameter equal to or less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5);

  • 11 ter. “Black carbon” means carbonaceous particulate matter that absorbs light;

  • 11 quater. “Ozone precursors” means nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, methane and carbon monoxide;

4. In paragraph 13, the words “or fluxes to receptors” are inserted after the word “atmosphere”.

5. In paragraph 15, the words “volatile organic compounds or ammonia” are replaced by the words “volatile organic compounds, ammonia or particulate matter”.

6. For paragraph 16 there is substituted:

“New stationary source” means any stationary source of which the construction or substantial modification is commenced after the expiry of one year from the date of entry into force for a Party of the present Protocol. A Party may decide not to treat as a new stationary source any stationary source for which approval has already been given by the appropriate competent national authorities at the time of entry into force of the Protocol for that Party and provided that the construction or substantial modification is commenced within 5 years of that date. It shall be a matter for the competent national authorities to decide whether a modification is substantial or not, taking account of such factors as the environmental benefits of the modification.

C.

Article 2

1. In the chapeau:

a) Before the words “The objective of the present Protocol” is inserted “1.”;

b) The words “ammonia and volatile organic compounds” are replaced by the words “ammonia, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter”;

c) The words “and the environment” are inserted after “human health”;

d) The words “materials and crops” are replaced by the words “materials, crops and the climate in the short and long term”; and

e) The words “, particulate matter” are inserted after the word “eutrophication”.

2. The words “, that allow ecosystem recovery” are inserted at the end of subparagraph (a).

3. In subparagraph (b), the words “, that allow ecosystem recovery” are added at the end of the subparagraph and the word “and” is deleted after the semicolon.

4. In subparagraph (c) (ii), the words “Canada-wide Standard” are replaced by the words “Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standard”.

5. New subparagraphs (d), (e) and (f) are added after subparagraph (c) as follows:

  • d) For particulate matter:

    • (i) For Parties within the geographical scope of EMEP, the critical levels of particulate matter, as given in annex I;

    • (ii) For Canada, the Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards for particulate matter; and

    • (iii) For the United States of America, the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for particulate matter;

  • e) For Parties within the geographical scope of EMEP, the critical levels of ammonia, as given in annex I; and

  • f) For Parties within the geographical scope of EMEP, the acceptable levels of air pollutants to protect materials, as given in annex I.

6. A new paragraph 2 is added at the end of article 2 as follows:

  • 2. A further objective is that Parties should, in implementing measures to achieve their national targets for particulate matter, give priority, to the extent they consider appropriate, to emission reduction measures which also significantly reduce black carbon in order to provide benefits for human health and the environment and to help mitigation of near-term climate change.

D.

Article 3

1. In paragraph 1:

a) The word “ceiling” in the first line is replaced by the words “reduction commitment”;

b) The word “ceiling” in the second line is replaced by the word “commitment”; and

c) The words “In taking steps to reduce emissions of particulate matter, each Party should seek reductions from those source categories known to emit high amounts of black carbon, to the extent it considers appropriate.” are added at the end of the paragraph.

2. In paragraphs 2 and 3, the words “V and VI” are replaced by the words “V, VI and X”.

3. The words “Subject to paragraphs 2 bis and 2 ter,” are inserted at the beginning of paragraph 2.

4. New paragraphs 2 bis and 2 ter are inserted as follows:

  • 2 bis. A Party that was already a Party to the present Protocol prior to entry into force of an amendment that introduces new source categories may apply the limit values applicable to an “existing stationary source“ to any source in such a new category the construction or substantial modification of which is commenced before the expiry of one year from the date of entry into force of that amendment for that Party, unless and until that source later undergoes substantial modification.

  • 2 ter. A Party that was already a Party to the present Protocol prior to entry into force of an amendment that introduces new limit values applicable to a “new stationary source” may continue to apply the previously applicable limit values to any source the construction or substantial modification of which is commenced before the expiry of one year from the date of entry into force of that amendment for that Party, unless and until that source later undergoes substantial modification.

5. Paragraph 4 is deleted.

6. For paragraph 6 there is substituted:

Each Party should apply best available techniques to mobile sources covered by annex VIII and to each stationary source covered by annexes IV, V, VI and X, and, as it considers appropriate, measures to control black carbon as a component of particulate matter, taking into account guidance adopted by the Executive Body.

7. For paragraph 7 there is substituted:

Each Party shall, insofar as it is technically and economically feasible, and taking into consideration the costs and advantages, apply the limit values for VOC contents of products as identified in annex XI in accordance with the timescales specified in annex VII.

8. In paragraph 8 (b):

a) The words “document V” and “at its seventeenth session (decision 1999/1) and any amendments thereto” are deleted; and

b) The following sentence is added at the end of the paragraph:

Special attention should be given to reductions of ammonia emissions from significant sources of ammonia for that Party.

9. In paragraph 9 (b), the words “ammonia and/or volatile organic compounds contributing to acidification, eutrophication or ozone formation” are replaced by the words “ammonia, volatile organic compounds and/or particulate matter contributing to acidification, eutrophication, ozone formation or increased levels of particulate matter”.

10. In paragraph 10 (b), the words “sulphur and/or volatile organic compounds” are replaced by the words “sulphur, volatile organic compounds and/or particulate matter”.

11. For paragraph 11 there is substituted the following:

Canada and the United States of America shall, upon ratification, acceptance or approval of, or accession to the present Protocol or the amendment contained in decision 2012/2 submit to the Executive Body their respective emission reduction commitments with respect to sulphur, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter for automatic incorporation into annex II.

12. New paragraphs are added after paragraph 11 as follows:

  • 11 bis. Canada shall also upon ratification, acceptance or approval of, or accession to the present Protocol, submit to the Executive Body relevant limit values for automatic incorporation into annexes IV, V, VI, VIII, X and XI.

  • 11 ter. Each Party shall develop and maintain inventories and projections for the emissions of sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, ammonia, volatile organic compounds, and particulate matter. Parties within the geographic scope of EMEP shall use the methodologies specified in guidelines prepared by the Steering Body of EMEP and adopted by the Parties at a session of the Executive Body. Parties in areas outside the geographic scope of EMEP shall use as guidance the methodologies developed through the workplan of the Executive Body.

  • 11 quater. Each Party should actively participate in programmes under the Convention on the effects of air pollution on human health and the environment.

  • 11 quinquies. For the purposes of comparing national emission totals with emission reduction commitments as set out in paragraph 1, a Party may use a procedure specified in a decision of the Executive Body. Such a procedure shall include provisions on the submission of supporting documentation and on review of the use of the procedure.

E.

Article 3 bis

1. A new article 3 bis is added as follows:

Article 3 bis Flexible Transitional Arrangements
  • 1. Notwithstanding article 3, paragraphs 2, 3, 5 and 6, a Party to the Convention that becomes a Party to the present Protocol between January 1, 2013, and December 31, 2019, may apply flexible transitional arrangements for the implementation of limit values specified in annexes VI and/or VIII under the conditions specified in this article.

  • 2. Any Party electing to apply the flexible transitional arrangements under this article shall indicate in its instrument of ratification, acceptance or approval of or accession to the present Protocol the following:

    • a) the specific provisions of annex VI and/or VIII for which the Party is electing to apply flexible transitional arrangements; and

    • b) an implementation plan identifying a timetable for full implementation of the specified provisions.

  • 3. An implementation plan under paragraph 2 (b) shall, at a minimum, provide for implementation of the limit values for new and existing stationary sources specified in Tables 1 and 5 of annex VI and Tables 1, 2, 3, 13 and 14 of annex VIII no later than eight years after entry into force of the present Protocol for the Party, or December 31, 2022, whichever is sooner.

  • 4. In no case may a Party’s implementation of any limit values for new and existing stationary sources specified in annex VI or annex VIII be postponed past December 31, 2030.

  • 5. A Party electing to apply the flexible transitional arrangements under this article shall provide the Executive Secretary of the Commission with a triennial report of its progress towards implementation of annex VI and/or annex VIII. The Executive Secretary of the Commission will make such triennial reports available to the Executive Body.

F.

Article 4

1. In paragraph 1, the words “ammonia and volatile organic compounds” are replaced by the words “ammonia, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter, including black carbon”.

2. In paragraph 1 (a), the words “low emission burners and good environmental practice in agriculture” are replaced by the words “low emission burners, good environmental practice in agriculture and measures that are known to mitigate emissions of black carbon as a component of particulate matter”.

G.

Article 5

1. In paragraph 1 (a):

a) The words “ammonia and volatile organic compounds” are replaced by the words “ammonia, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter, including black carbon”; and

b) The words “national emission ceilings or” are replaced by the words “emission reduction commitments and”.

2. For paragraph 1 (c) is substituted:

  • c) Levels of ground-level ozone and particulate matter;

3. In paragraph 1 (d), “6.” is replaced by “6; and”.

4. A new paragraph 1 (e) is added as follows:

  • e) The environmental and human health improvements associated with attaining emission reduction commitments for 2020 and beyond as listed in annex II.

    For countries within the geographical scope of EMEP, information on such improvements will be presented in guidance adopted by the Executive Body.

5. In paragraph 2 (e):

a) The words “Health and environmental” are replaced by the words “Human health, environmental and climate”; and

b) The words “reduction of” are inserted after the words “associated with”.

H.

Article 6

1. In paragraph 1 (b), the words “ammonia and volatile organic compounds” are replaced by the words “ammonia, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter”.

2. In paragraph 1 (f), the words “documents 1 to V” and “at its seventeenth session (decision 1999/1) and any amendments thereto” are deleted.

3. In paragraph 1 (g), the words “document VI” and “at its seventeenth session (decision 1999/1) and any amendments thereto” are deleted.

4. In paragraph 1 (h), the words “ammonia and volatile organic compounds” are replaced by the words “ammonia, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter”.

5. For paragraph 2 is substituted:

Each Party shall collect and maintain information on:

  • a) Ambient concentrations and depositions of sulphur and nitrogen compounds;

  • b) Ambient concentrations of ozone, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter; and

  • c) If practicable, estimates of exposure to ground-level ozone and particulate matter.

Each Party shall, if practicable, also collect and maintain information on the effects of all of these pollutants on human health, terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, materials and the climate. Parties within the geographic scope of EMEP should use guidelines adopted by the Executive Body. Parties outside the geographic scope of EMEP should use as guidance the methodologies developed through the workplan of the Executive Body.

6. A new paragraph 2 bis is inserted as follows:

  • 2 bis. Each Party should, to the extent it considers appropriate, also develop and maintain inventories and projections for emissions of black carbon, using guidelines adopted by the Executive Body.

I.

Article 7

1. In paragraph 1 (a) (ii), for the words “paragraph 3” are substituted the words “paragraphs 3 and 7”.

2. For the chapeau of paragraph 1 (b) is substituted:

  • b) Each Party within the geographical scope of EMEP shall report to EMEP through the Executive Secretary of the Commission the following information for the emissions of sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, ammonia, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter, on the basis of guidelines prepared by the Steering Body of EMEP and adopted by the Executive Body:

3. In paragraph 1 (b) (i), the words “of sulphur, nitrogen oxides, ammonia and volatile organic compounds” are deleted.

4. In paragraph 1 (b) (ii):

a) The words “of each substance” are deleted; and

b) For the number “(1990)” is substituted the words “specified in annex II”.

5. In paragraph 1 (b) (iii), the words “and current reduction plans” are deleted.

6. For paragraph 1 (b) (iv) is substituted:

  • (iv) An Informative Inventory Report containing detailed information on reported emission inventories and emission projections;

7. A new paragraph 1 (b bis) is added as follows:

  • b bis) Each Party within the geographical scope of EMEP should report available information to the Executive Body, through the Executive Secretary of the Commission, on its air pollution effects programmes on human health and the environment and atmospheric monitoring and modelling programmes under the Convention, using guidelines adopted by the Executive Body;

8. For paragraph 1 (c), there is substituted:

  • c) Parties in areas outside the geographical scope of EMEP shall report available information on levels of emissions, including for the reference year specified in annex II and appropriate to the geographic area covered by its emission reduction commitments. Parties in areas outside the geographic scope of EMEP should make available information similar to that specified in subparagraph (b bis), if requested to do so by the Executive Body.

9. A new subparagraph (d) is added after subparagraph 1 (c) as follows:

  • d) Each Party should also report, where available, its emissions inventories and projections for emissions of black carbon, using guidelines adopted by the Executive Body.

10. For the chapeau to paragraph 3, there is substituted:

Upon the request of and in accordance with the timescales decided by the Executive Body, EMEP and other subsidiary bodies shall provide the Executive Body with relevant information on:

11. In paragraph 3 (a), the words “particulate matter including black carbon,” are inserted after the words “concentrations of”.

12. In paragraph 3 (b), the words “ozone and its precursors.” are replaced by the words “particulate matter, ground-level ozone and their precursors;”.

13. New subparagraphs (c) and (d) are inserted after subparagraph 3 (b) as follows:

  • c) Adverse effects on human health, natural ecosystems, materials and crops, including interactions with climate change and the environment related to the substances covered by the present Protocol, and progress in achieving human health and environmental improvements as described in guidance adopted by the Executive Body; and

  • d) The calculation of nitrogen budgets, nitrogen use efficiency and nitrogen surpluses and their improvements within the geographical area of EMEP, using guidance adopted by the Executive Body.

14. The final sentence of paragraph 3 is deleted.

15. In paragraph 4, the words “and particulate matter” are added at the end of the paragraph.

16. In paragraph 5, the words “actual ozone concentrations and the critical levels of ozone” are replaced by the words “actual ozone and particulate matter concentrations and the critical levels of ozone and particulate matter”.

17. A new paragraph 6 is added as follows:

  • 6. Notwithstanding article 7.1 (b), a Party may request the Executive Body for permission to report a limited inventory for a particular pollutant or pollutants if:

    • a) The Party did not previously have reporting obligations under the present Protocol or any other protocol for that pollutant; and

    • b) The limited inventory of the Party includes, at a minimum, all large point sources of the pollutant or pollutants within the Party or a relevant PEMA.

    The Executive Body shall grant such a request annually for up to five years after entry into force of the present Protocol for a Party, but in no case for reporting of emissions for any year after 2019. Such a request will be accompanied by information on progress toward developing a more complete inventory as part of the Party’s annual reporting.

J.

Article 8

1. In paragraph (b), the words “particulate matter, including black carbon,” are inserted after the words “those on”.

2. In paragraph (c), the words “nitrogen compounds and volatile organic compounds” are replaced by the words “nitrogen compounds, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter, including black carbon”.

3. After paragraph (d), a new paragraph (d bis) is added as follows:

The improvement of the scientific understanding of the potential co-benefits for climate change mitigation associated with potential reduction scenarios for air pollutants (such as methane, carbon monoxide and black carbon) which have nearterm radiative forcing and other climate effects;

4. In paragraph (e), the words “eutrophication and photochemical pollution” are replaced by the words “eutrophication, photochemical pollution and particulate matter”.

5. In paragraph (f), the words “ammonia and volatile organic compounds” are replaced by the words “ammonia, volatile organic compounds and other ozone precursors, and particulate matter”.

6. In paragraph (g):

a) The words “nitrogen and volatile organic compounds” are replaced by the words “nitrogen, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter”;

b) The words “including their contribution to concentrations of particulate matter,” are deleted; and

c) The words “volatile organic compounds and tropospheric ozone” are replaced by the words “volatile organic compounds, particulate matter and ground-level ozone”.

7. In paragraph (k):

a) The words “environment and human health” are replaced by the words “environment, human health and the impacts on climate”; and

b) The words “ammonia and volatile organic compounds” are replaced by the words “ammonia, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter”.

K.

Article 10

1. In paragraph 1, the words “sulphur and nitrogen compounds” are replaced by the words “sulphur, nitrogen compounds and particulate matter”.

2. In paragraph 2 (b):

a) The words “health effects” are replaced by the words “human health effects, climate co-benefits”; and

b) The words “particulate matter,” are inserted after the words “related to”.

3. New paragraphs 3 and 4 are added as follows:

  • 3. The Executive Body shall include in its reviews under this article an evaluation of mitigation measures for black carbon emissions, no later than at the second session of the Executive Body after entry into force of the amendment contained in decision 2012/2.

  • 4. The Parties shall, no later than at the second session of the Executive Body after entry into force of the amendment contained in decision 2012/2, evaluate ammonia control measures and consider the need to revise annex IX.

L.

Article 13

For article 13 there shall be substituted:

Article 13 Adjustments
  • 1. Any Party to the Convention may propose an adjustment to annex II to the present Protocol to add to it its name, together with emission levels, emission ceilings and percentage emission reductions.

  • 2. Any Party may propose an adjustment of its emission reduction commitments already listed in annex II. Such a proposal must include supporting documentation, and shall be reviewed, as specified in a decision of the Executive Body. This review shall take place prior to the proposal being discussed by the Parties in accordance with paragraph 4.

  • 3. Any Party eligible under article 3, paragraph 9, may propose an adjustment to annex III to add one or more PEMAs or make changes to a PEMA under its jurisdiction that is listed in that annex.

  • 4. Proposed adjustments shall be submitted in writing to the Executive Secretary of the Commission, who shall communicate them to all Parties. The Parties shall discuss the proposed adjustments at the next session of the Executive Body, provided that those proposals have been circulated by the Executive Secretary to the Parties at least ninety days in advance.

  • 5. Adjustments shall be adopted by consensus of the Parties present at a session of the Executive Body and shall become effective for all Parties to the present Protocol on the ninetieth day following the date on which the Executive Secretary of the Commission notifies those Parties in writing of the adoption of the adjustment.

Article 13 bis Amendments
  • 1. Any Party may propose amendments to the present Protocol.

  • 2. Proposed amendments shall be submitted in writing to the Executive Secretary of the Commission, who shall communicate them to all Parties. The Parties shall discuss the proposed amendments at the next session of the Executive Body, provided that those proposals have been circulated by the Executive Secretary to the Parties at least ninety days in advance.

  • 3. Amendments to the present Protocol other than to annexes I and III shall be adopted by consensus of the Parties present at a session of the Executive Body, and shall enter into force for the Parties which have accepted them on the ninetieth day after the date on which two thirds of those that were Parties at the time of their adoption have deposited with the Depositary their instruments of acceptance thereof.

    Amendments shall enter into force for any other Party on the ninetieth day after the date on which that Party has deposited its instrument of acceptance thereof.

  • 4. Amendments to annexes I and III to the present Protocol shall be adopted by consensus of the Parties present at a session of the Executive Body. On the expiry of one hundred and eighty days from the date of its communication to all Parties by the Executive Secretary of the Commission, an amendment to any such annex shall become effective for those Parties which have not submitted to the Depositary a notification in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 5, provided that at least sixteen Parties have not submitted such a notification.

  • 5. Any Party that is unable to approve an amendment to annexes I and/or III, shall so notify the Depositary in writing within ninety days from the date of the communication of its adoption. The Depositary shall without delay notify all Parties of any such notification received. A Party may at any time substitute an acceptance for its previous notification and, upon deposit of an instrument of acceptance with the Depositary, the amendment to such an annex shall become effective for that Party.

  • 6. For those Parties having accepted it, the procedure set out in paragraph 7 supersedes the procedure set out in paragraph 3 in respect of amendments to annexes IV to XI.

  • 7. Amendments to annexes IV to XI shall be adopted by consensus of the Parties present at a session of the Executive Body. On the expiry of one year from the date of its communication to all Parties by the Executive Secretary of the Commission, an amendment to any such annex shall become effective for those Parties which have not submitted to the Depositary a notification in accordance with the provisions of subparagraph (a):

    • a) Any Party that is unable to approve an amendment to annexes IV to XI shall so notify the Depositary in writing within one year from the date of the communication of its adoption. The Depositary shall without delay notify all Parties of any such notification received. A Party may at any time substitute an acceptance for its previous notification and, upon deposit of an instrument of acceptance with the Depositary, the amendment to such an annex shall become effective for that Party;

    • b) Any amendment to annexes IV to XI shall not enter into force if an aggregate number of sixteen or more Parties have either:

      • (i) Submitted a notification in accordance with the provisions of subparagraph (a); or

      • (ii) Not accepted the procedure set out in this paragraph and not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 3.

M.

Article 15

A new paragraph 4 is added as follows:

  • 4. A State or Regional Economic Integration Organisation shall declare in its instrument of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession if it does not intend to be bound by the procedures set out in article 13bis, paragraph 7, as regards the amendment of annexes IV – XI.

N.

New Article 18 bis

A new Article 18 bis is added after Article 18 as follows:

Article 18 bis Termination of Protocols

When all of the Parties to any of the following Protocols have deposited their instruments of ratification, acceptance, approval of or accession to the present Protocol with the Depository in accordance with article 15, that Protocol shall be considered as terminated:

  • a) The 1985 Helsinki Protocol on the Reduction of Sulphur Emissions or their Transboundary Fluxes by at least 30 per cent;

  • b) The 1988 Sofia Protocol concerning the Control of Emissions of Nitrogen Oxides or their Transboundary Fluxes;

  • c) The 1991 Geneva Protocol concerning the Control of Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds or their Transboundary Fluxes;

  • d) The 1994 Oslo Protocol on Further Reduction of Sulphur Emissions.

O.

Annex II

For annex II the following text is substituted:

Emission reduction commitments
  • 1. The emission reduction commitments listed in the tables below relate to the provisions of article 3, paragraphs 1 and 10, of the present Protocol.

  • 2. Table 1 includes the emission ceilings for sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), ammonia (NH3) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for 2010 up to 2020 expressed in thousands of metric tons (tonnes) for those Parties that ratified the present Protocol prior to 2010.

  • 3. Tables 2–6 include emission reduction commitments for SO2, NOx, NH3, VOCs and PM2.5 for 2020 and beyond. These commitments are expressed as a percentage reduction from the 2005 emission level.

  • 4. The 2005 emission estimates listed in tables 2-6 are in thousands of tonnes and represent the latest best available data reported by the Parties in 2012. These estimates are given for information purposes only, and may be updated by the Parties in the course of their reporting of emission data under the present Protocol if better information becomes available. The Secretariat will maintain and regularly update on the Convention’s website a table of the most up-to-date estimates reported by Parties, for information. The percentage emission reduction commitments listed in tables 2-6 are applicable to the most up-to-date 2005 estimates as reported by the Parties to the Executive Secretary of the Commission.

  • 5. If in a given year a Party finds that, due to a particularly cold winter, a particularly dry summer or unforeseen variations in economic activities, such as a loss of capacity in the power supply system domestically or in a neighbouring country, it cannot comply with its emission reduction commitments, it may fulfil those commitments by averaging its national annual emissions for the year in question, the year preceding that year and the year following it, provided that this average does not exceed its commitment.

    Table 1 Emission ceilings for 2010 up to 2020 for Parties that ratified the present Protocol prior to 2010 (expressed in thousands of tonnes per year)

    Party

    Ratification

    SO2

    NOx

    NH3

    VOCs

    1

    Belgium

    2007

    106

    181

    74

    144

    2

    Bulgaria

    2005

    856

    266

    108

    185

    3

    Croatia

    2008

    70

    87

    30

    90

    4

    Cyprus

    2007

    39

    23

    9

    14

    5

    Czech Republic

    2004

    283

    286

    101

    220

    6

    Denmark

    2002

    55

    127

    69

    85

    7

    Finland

    2003

    116

    170

    31

    130

    8

    France

    2007

    400

    860

    780

    1,100

    9

    Germany

    2004

    550

    1,081

    550

    995

    10

    Hungary

    2006

    550

    198

    90

    137

    11

    Latvia

    2004

    107

    84

    44

    136

    12

    Lithuania

    2004

    145

    110

    84

    92

    13

    Luxembourg

    2001

    4

    11

    7

    9

    14

    Netherlands

    2004

    50

    266

    128

    191

    15

    Norway

    2002

    22

    156

    23

    195

    16

    Portugal

    2005

    170

    260

    108

    202

    17

    Romania

    2003

    918

    437

    210

    523

    18

    Slovakia

    2005

    110

    130

    39

    140

    19

    Slovenia

    2004

    27

    45

    20

    40

    20

    Spain1)

    2005

    774

    847

    353

    669

    21

    Sweden

    2002

    67

    148

    57

    241

    22

    Switzerland

    2005

    26

    79

    63

    144

    23

    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    2005

    625

    1,181

    297

    1,200

    24

    United States of America

    2004

    2)

    3)

     

    4)

    25

    European Union

    2003

    7,832

    8,180

    4,294

    7,585

    X Noot
    1)

    Figures apply to the European part of the country.

    X Noot
    2)

    Upon acceptance of the present Protocol in 2004, the United States of America provided an indicative target for 2010 of 16,013,000 tons for total sulphur emissions from the PEMA identified for sulphur, the 48 contiguous United States and the District of Columbia. This figure converts to 14,527,000 tonnes.

    X Noot
    3)

    Upon acceptance of the present Protocol in 2004, the United States of America provided an indicative target for 2010 of 6,897,000 tons for total NOx emissions from the PEMA identified for NOx, Connecticut, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. This figure converts to 6,257,000 tonnes.

    X Noot
    4)

    Upon acceptance of the present Protocol in 2004, the United States of America provided an indicative target for 2010 of 4,972,000 tons for total VOC emissions from the PEMA identified for VOCs, Connecticut, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. This figure converts to 4,511,000 tonnes.

    Table 2 Emission reduction commitments for sulphur dioxide for 2020 and beyond

    Convention Party

    Emission levels 2005 in thousands of tonnes of SO2

    Reduction from 2005 level (%)

    1

    Austria

    27

    26

    2

    Belarus

    79

    20

    3

    Belgium

    145

    43

    4

    Bulgaria

    777

    78

    5

    Canada1)

       

    6

    Croatia

    63

    55

    7

    Cyprus

    38

    83

    8

    Czech Republic

    219

    45

    9

    Denmark

    23

    35

    10

    Estonia

    76

    32

    11

    Finland

    69

    30

    12

    France

    467

    55

    13

    Germany

    517

    21

    14

    Greece

    542

    74

    15

    Hungary

    129

    46

    16

    Ireland

    71

    65

    17

    Italy

    403

    35

    18

    Latvia

    6.7

    8

    19

    Lithuania

    44

    55

    20

    Luxembourg

    2.5

    34

    21

    Malta

    11

    77

    22

    Netherlands2)

    65

    28

    23

    Norway

    24

    10

    24

    Poland

    1.224

    59

    25

    Portugal

    177

    63

    26

    Romania

    643

    77

    27

    Slovakia

    89

    57

    28

    Slovenia

    40

    63

    29

    Spain2)

    1,282

    67

    30

    Sweden

    36

    22

    31

    Switzerland

    17

    21

    32

    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    706

    59

    33

    United States of America3)

       

    34

    European Union

    7,828

    59

    X Noot
    1)

    Upon ratification, acceptance or approval of, or accession to the present Protocol, Canada shall provide: (a) a value for total estimated sulphur emission levels for 2005, either national or for its PEMA, if it has submitted one; and (b) an indicative value for a reduction of total sulphur emission levels for 2020 from 2005 levels, either at the national level or for its PEMA. Item (a) will be included in the table, and item (b) will be included in a footnote to the table. The PEMA, if submitted, will be offered as an adjustment to annex III to the Protocol.

    X Noot
    2)

    Figures apply to the European part of the country.

    X Noot
    3)

    Upon ratification, acceptance or approval of, or accession to the amendment adding this table to the present Protocol, the United States of America shall provide: (a) a value for total estimated sulphur emission levels for 2005, either national or for a PEMA; (b) an indicative value for a reduction of total sulphur emission levels for 2020 from identified 2005 levels; and (c) any changes to the PEMA identified when the United States became a Party to the Protocol. Item (a) will be included in the table, item (b) will be included in a footnote to the table, and item (c) will be offered as an adjustment to annex III.

    Table 3 Emission reduction commitments for nitrogen oxides for 2020 and beyond1)

    Convention Party

    Emission levels 2005 in thousands of tonnes of NO2

    Reduction from 2005 level (%)

    1

    Austria

    231

    37

    2

    Belarus

    171

    25

    3

    Belgium

    291

    41

    4

    Bulgaria

    154

    41

    5

    Canada2)

       

    6

    Croatia

    81

    31

    7

    Cyprus

    21

    44

    8

    Czech Republic

    286

    35

    9

    Denmark

    181

    56

    10

    Estonia

    36

    18

    11

    Finland

    177

    35

    12

    France

    1,430

    50

    13

    Germany

    1,464

    39

    14

    Greece

    419

    31

    15

    Hungary

    203

    34

    16

    Ireland

    127

    49

    17

    Italy

    1,212

    40

    18

    Latvia

    37

    32

    19

    Lithuania

    58

    48

    20

    Luxembourg

    19

    43

    21

    Malta

    9.3

    42

    22

    Netherlands3)

    370

    45

    23

    Norway

    200

    23

    24

    Poland

    866

    30

    25

    Portugal

    256

    36

    26

    Romania

    309

    45

    27

    Slovakia

    102

    36

    28

    Slovenia

    47

    39

    29

    Spain3)

    1,292

    41

    30

    Sweden

    174

    36

    31

    Switzerland4)

    94

    41

    32

    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    1,580

    55

    33

    United States of America5)

       

    34

    European Union

    11,354

    42

    X Noot
    1)

    Emissions from soils are not included in the 2005 estimates for EU member States.

    X Noot
    2)

    Upon ratification, acceptance or approval of, or accession to the present Protocol, Canada shall provide: (a) a value for total estimated nitrogen oxide emission levels for 2005, either national or for its PEMA, if it has submitted one; and (b) an indicative value for a reduction of total nitrogen oxide emission levels for 2020 from 2005 levels, either at the national level or for its PEMA. Item (a) will be included in the table, and item (b) will be included in a footnote to the table. The PEMA, if submitted, will be offered as an adjustment to annex III to the Protocol.

    X Noot
    3)

    Figures apply to the European part of the country.

    X Noot
    4)

    Including emissions from crop production and agricultural soils (NFR 4D).

    X Noot
    5)

    Upon ratification, acceptance or approval of, or accession to the amendment adding this table to the present Protocol, the United States of America shall provide: (a) a value for total estimated nitrogen oxides emission levels for 2005, either national or for a PEMA; (b) an indicative value for a reduction of total nitrogen oxides emission levels for 2020 from identified 2005 levels; and (c) any changes to the PEMA identified when the United States became a Party to the Protocol. Item (a) will be included in the table, item (b) will be included in a footnote to the table, and item (c) will be offered as an adjustment to annex III.

    Table 4 Emission reduction commitments for ammonia for 2020 and beyond

    Convention Party

    Emission levels 2005 in thousands of tonnes of NH3

    Reduction from 2005 level (%)

    1

    Austria

    63

    1

    2

    Belarus

    136

    7

    3

    Belgium

    71

    2

    4

    Bulgaria

    60

    3

    5

    Croatia

    40

    1

    6

    Cyprus

    5.8

    10

    7

    Czech Republic

    82

    7

    8

    Denmark

    83

    24

    9

    Estonia

    9.8

    1

    10

    Finland

    39

    20

    11

    France

    661

    4

    12

    Germany

    573

    5

    13

    Greece

    68

    7

    14

    Hungary

    80

    10

    15

    Ireland

    109

    1

    16

    Italy

    416

    5

    17

    Latvia

    16

    1

    18

    Lithuania

    39

    10

    19

    Luxembourg

    5.0

    1

    20

    Malta

    1.6

    4

    21

    Netherlands1)

    141

    13

    22

    Norway

    23

    8

    23

    Poland

    270

    1

    24

    Portugal

    50

    7

    25

    Romania

    199

    13

    26

    Slovakia

    29

    15

    27

    Slovenia

    18

    1

    28

    Spain1)

    365

    3

    29

    Sweden

    55

    15

    30

    Switzerland

    64

    8

    31

    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    307

    8

    32

    European Union

    3,813

    6

    X Noot
    1)

    Figures apply to the European part of the country.

    Table 5 Emission reduction commitments for Volatile Organic Compounds for 2020 and beyond

    Convention Party

    Emission levels 2005 in thousands of tonnes of VOC

    Reduction from 2005 level (%)

    1

    Austria

    162

    21

    2

    Belarus

    349

    15

    3

    Belgium

    143

    21

    4

    Bulgaria

    158

    21

    5

    Canada1)

       

    6

    Croatia

    101

    34

    7

    Cyprus

    14

    45

    8

    Czech Republic

    182

    18

    9

    Denmark

    110

    35

    10

    Estonia

    41

    10

    11

    Finland

    131

    35

    12

    France

    1,232

    43

    13

    Germany

    1,143

    13

    14

    Greece

    222

    54

    15

    Hungary

    177

    30

    16

    Ireland

    57

    25

    17

    Italy

    1,286

    35

    18

    Latvia

    73

    27

    19

    Lithuania

    84

    32

    20

    Luxembourg

    9.8

    29

    21

    Malta

    3.3

    23

    22

    Netherlands2)

    182

    8

    23

    Norway

    218

    40

    24

    Poland

    593

    25

    25

    Portugal

    207

    18

    26

    Romania

    425

    25

    27

    Slovakia

    73

    18

    28

    Slovenia

    37

    23

    29

    Spain2)

    809

    22

    30

    Sweden

    197

    25

    31

    Switzerland3)

    103

    30

    32

    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    1,088

    32

    33

    United States of America4)

       

    34

    European Union

    8,842

    28

    X Noot
    1)

    Upon ratification, acceptance or approval of, or accession to the present Protocol, Canada shall provide: (a) a value for total estimated VOC emission levels for 2005, either national or for its PEMA, if it has submitted one; and (b) an indicative value for a reduction of total VOC emission levels for 2020 from 2005 levels, either at the national level or for its PEMA. Item (a) will be included in the table, and item (b) will be included in a footnote to the table. The PEMA, if submitted, will be offered as an adjustment to annex III to the Protocol.

    X Noot
    2)

    Figures apply to the European part of the country.

    X Noot
    3)

    Including emissions from crop production and agricultural soils (NFR 4D).

    X Noot
    4)

    Upon ratification, acceptance or approval of, or accession to the amendment adding this table to the present Protocol, the United States of America shall provide: (a) a value for total estimated VOC emission levels for 2005, either national or for a PEMA; (b) an indicative value for a reduction of total VOC emission levels for 2020 from identified 2005 levels; and (c) any changes to the PEMA identified when the United States became a Party to the Protocol. Item (a) will be included in the table, item (b) will be included in a footnote to the table, and item (c) will be offered as an adjustment to annex III.

    Table 6 Emission reduction commitments for PM2.5 for 2020 and beyond

    Convention Party

    Emission levels 2005 in thousands of tonnes of PM2.5

    Reduction from 2005 level (%)

    1

    Austria

    22

    20

    2

    Belarus

    46

    10

    3

    Belgium

    24

    20

    4

    Bulgaria

    44

    20

    5

    Canada1)

       

    6

    Croatia

    13

    18

    7

    Cyprus

    2.9

    46

    8

    Czech Republic

    22

    17

    9

    Denmark

    25

    33

    10

    Estonia

    20

    15

    11

    Finland

    36

    30

    12

    France

    304

    27

    13

    Germany

    121

    26

    14

    Greece

    56

    35

    15

    Hungary

    31

    13

    16

    Ireland

    11

    18

    17

    Italy

    166

    10

    18

    Latvia

    27

    16

    19

    Lithuania

    8.7

    20

    20

    Luxembourg

    3.1

    15

    21

    Malta

    1.3

    25

    22

    Netherlands2)

    21

    37

    23

    Norway

    52

    30

    24

    Poland

    133

    16

    25

    Portugal

    65

    15

    26

    Romania

    106

    28

    27

    Slovakia

    37

    36

    28

    Slovenia

    14

    25

    29

    Spain2)

    93

    15

    30

    Sweden

    29

    19

    31

    Switzerland

    11

    26

    32

    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    81

    30

    33

    United States of America3)

       

    34

    European Union

    1,504

    22

    X Noot
    1)

    Upon ratification, acceptance or approval of, or accession to the present Protocol, Canada shall provide: (a) a value for total estimated PM emission levels for 2005, either national or for its PEMA, if it has submitted one; and (b) an indicative value for a reduction of total emission levels of PM for 2020 from 2005 levels, either at the national level or for its PEMA.

    Item (a) will be included in the table, and item (b) will be included in a footnote to the table.

    The PEMA, if submitted, will be offered as an adjustment to annex III to the Protocol.

    X Noot
    2)

    Figures apply to the European part of the country.

    X Noot
    3)

    Upon ratification, acceptance or approval of, or accession to the amendment adding this table to the present Protocol, the United States of America shall provide: (a) a value for total estimated PM2.5 emission levels for 2005, either national or for a PEMA; and (b) an indicative value for a reduction of total PM2.5 emission levels for 2020 from identified 2005 levels. Item (a) will be included in the table and item (b) will be included in a footnote to the table.

P.

Annex III

1. In the sentence underneath the heading, the words “PEMA is” are replaced by the words “PEMAs are”.

2. A new subheading and paragraph are added before the entry for the Russian Federation PEMA as follows:

Canada PEMA

The PEMA for sulphur for Canada is an area of 1 million square kilometres which includes all the territory of the Provinces of Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, all the territory of the Province of Québec south of a straight line between Havre-St. Pierre on the north coast of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and the point where Québec-Ontario boundary intersects with the James Bay coastline, and all the territory of the Province of Ontario south of a straight line between the point where the Ontario-Québec boundary intersects the James Bay coastline and the Nipigon River near the north shore of Lake Superior.

3. For the paragraph underneath the subheading “Russian Federation PEMA” there is substituted:

The Russian Federation PEMA corresponds to the European territory of the Russian Federation. The European territory of the Russian Federation is a part of the territory of Russia within the administrative and geographical boundaries of the entities of the Russian Federation located in Eastern Europe bordering the Asian continent in accordance with the conventional borderline that passes from north to south along the Ural Mountains, the border with Kazakhstan to the Caspian Sea, then along the State borders with Azerbaijan and Georgia in the North Caucasus to the Black Sea.

Q.

Annex IV

1. For annex IV the following text is substituted:

Limit values for emissions of sulphur from stationary sources
  • 1. Section A applies to Parties other than Canada and the United States of America, section B applies to Canada and section C applies to the United States of America.

A. Parties other than Canada and the United States of America

  • 2. For the purpose of this section “emission limit value” (ELV) means the quantity of SO2 (or SOx where mentioned as such) contained in the waste gases from an installation that is not to be exceeded. Unless otherwise specified, it shall be calculated in terms of mass of SO2 (SOx, expressed as SO2) per volume of the waste gases (expressed as mg/m3), assuming standard conditions for temperature and pressure for dry gas (volume at 273.15 K, 101.3 kPa). With regard to the oxygen content of the waste gas, the values given in the tables below for each source category shall apply. Dilution for the purpose of lowering concentrations of pollutants in waste gases is not permitted. Start-up, shutdown and maintenance of equipment are excluded.

  • 3. Compliance with ELVs, minimum desulphurization rates, sulphur recovery rates and sulphur content limit values shall be verified:

    • a) Emissions shall be monitored through measurements or through calculations achieving at least the same accuracy. Compliance with ELVs shall be verified through continuous or discontinuous measurements, type approval, or any other technically sound method including verified calculation methods. In case of continuous measurements, compliance with the ELV is achieved if the validated monthly emission average does not exceed the limit value, unless otherwise specified for the individual source category. In case of discontinuous measurements or other appropriate determination or calculation procedures, compliance with the ELV is achieved if the mean value based on an appropriate number of measurements under representative conditions does not exceed the ELV. The inaccuracy of the measurement methods may be taken into account for verification purposes;

    • b) In case of combustion plants applying the minimum rates of desulphurization set out in paragraph 5 (a) (ii), the sulphur content of the fuel shall also be regularly monitored and the competent authorities shall be informed of substantial changes in the type of fuel used. The desulphurization rates shall apply as monthly average values;

    • c) Compliance with the minimum sulphur recovery rate shall be verified through regular measurements or any other technically sound method;

    • d) Compliance with the sulphur limit values for gas oil shall be verified through regular targeted measurements.

  • 4. Monitoring of relevant polluting substances and measurements of process parameters, as well as the quality assurance of automated measuring systems and the reference measurements to calibrate those systems, shall be carried out in accordance with European Committee for Standardization (CEN) standards. If CEN standards are not available, International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards, national or international standards which will ensure the provision of data of an equivalent scientific quality shall apply.

  • 5. The following subparagraphs set out special provisions for combustion plants referred to in paragraph 7:

    • a) A Party may derogate from the obligation to comply with the emission limit values provided for in paragraph 7 in the following cases:

      • (i) For a combustion plant which to this end normally uses low-sulphur fuel, in cases where the operator is unable to comply with those limit values because of an interruption in the supply of low-sulphur fuel resulting from a serious shortage;

      • (ii) For a combustion plant firing indigenous solid fuel, which cannot comply with the emission limit values provided for in paragraph 7, instead at least the following limit values for the rates of desulphurization have to be met:

        • aa) Existing plants: 50–100 MWth: 80%;

        • bb) Existing plants: 100–300 MWth: 90%;

        • cc) Existing plants: > 300 MWth: 95%;

        • dd) New plants: 50–300 MWth: 93%;

        • ee) New plants: > 300 MWth: 97%;

      • (iii) For combustion plants normally using gaseous fuel which have to resort exceptionally to the use of other fuels because of a sudden interruption in the supply of gas and for this reason would need to be equipped with a waste gas purification facility;

      • (iv) For existing combustion plants not operated more than 17,500 operating hours, starting from 1 January 2016 and ending no later than 31 December 2023;

      • (v) For existing combustion plants using solid or liquid fuels not operated more than 1,500 operating hours per year as a rolling average over a period of five years, instead the following ELVs apply:

        • aa) For solid fuels: 800 mg/m3;

        • bb) For liquid fuels: 850 mg/m3 for plants with a rated thermal input not exceeding 300 MWth and 400 mg/m3 for plants with a rated thermal input greater than 300 MWth;

    • b) Where a combustion plant is extended by at least 50 MWth, the ELV specified in paragraph 7 for new installations shall apply to the extensional part affected by the change. The ELV is calculated as an average weighted by the actual thermal input for both the existing and the new part of the plant;

    • c) Parties shall ensure that provisions are made for procedures relating to malfunction or breakdown of the abatement equipment;

    • d) In the case of a multi-fuel firing combustion plant involving the simultaneous use of two or more fuels, the ELV shall be determined as the weighted average of the ELVs for the individual fuels, on the basis of the thermal input delivered by each fuel.

  • 6. Parties may apply rules by which combustion plants and process plants within a mineral oil refinery may be exempted from compliance with the individual SO2 limit values set out in this annex, provided that they are complying with a bubble SO2 limit value determined on the basis of the best available techniques.

  • 7. Combustion plants with a rated thermal input exceeding 50 MWth:1)

    Table 1 Limit values for SO2 emissions from combustion plants1)

    Fuel type

    Thermal input (MWth)

    ELV for SO2 mg/m3 2)

    Solid fuels

    50–100

    New plants:

    400 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels)

    300 (peat)

    200 (biomass)

         
       

    Existing plants:

    400 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels)

    300 (peat)

    200 (biomass)

         
     

    100–300

    New plants:

    200 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels)

    300 (peat)

    200 (biomass)

         
       

    Existing plants:

    250 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels)

    300 (peat)

    200 (biomass)

         
     

    >300

    New plants:

    150 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels) (FBC: 200)

    150 (peat) (FBC: 200)

    150 (biomass)

         
       

    Existing plants:

    200 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels)

    200 (peat)

    200 (biomass)

         

    Liquid fuels

    50–100

    New plants: 350

    Existing plants: 350

         
     

    100–300

    New plants: 200

    Existing plants: 250

         
     

    >300

    New plants: 150

    Existing plants: 200

         

    Gaseous fuels in general

    >50

    New plants: 35

    Existing plants: 35

         

    Liquefied gas

    >50

    New plants: 5

    Existing plants: 5

         

    Coke oven gas or blast furnace gas

    >50

    New plants:

    200 for blast furnace gas

    400 for coke oven gas

         
       

    Existing plants:

    200 for blast furnace gas

    400 for coke oven gas

         

    Gasified refinery residues

    > 50

    New plants: 35

    Existing plants: 800

    Note: FBC = Fluidized bed combustion (circulating pressurized, bubbling).

    X Noot
    1)

    In particular, the ELVs shall not apply to:

    • Plants in which the products of combustion are used for direct heating, drying, or any other treatment of objects or materials;

    • Post-combustion plants designed to purify the waste gases by combustion which are not operated as independent combustion plants;

    • Facilities for the regeneration of catalytic cracking catalysts;

    • Facilities for the conversion of hydrogen sulphide into sulphur;

    • Reactors used in the chemical industry;

    • Coke battery furnaces;

    • Cowpers;

    • Recovery boilers within installations for the production of pulp;

    • Waste incinerators; and

    • Plants powered by diesel, petrol or gas engines or by combustion turbines, irrespective of the fuel used.

    X Noot
    2)

    The O2 reference content is 6% for solid fuels and 3% for liquid and gaseous fuels.

  • 8. Gas oil:

    Table 2 Limit values for the sulphur content of gas oil1)
     

    Sulphur content (per cent by weight)

    Gas oil

    < 0.10

    X Noot
    1)

    “Gas oil” means any petroleum-derived liquid fuel, excluding marine fuel, falling within CN code 2710 19 25, 2710 19 29, 2710 19 45 or 2710 19 49, or any petroleum-derived liquid fuel, excluding marine fuel, of which less than 65% by volume (including losses) distils at 250° C and of which at least 85% by volume (including losses) distils at 350° C by the ASTM D86 method. Diesel fuels, i.e., gas oils falling within CN code 2710 19 41 and used for selfpropelling vehicles, are excluded from this definition. Fuels used in non-road mobile machinery and agricultural tractors are also excluded from this definition.

  • 9. Mineral oil and gas refineries:

    Sulphur recovery units: for plants that produce more than 50 Mg of sulphur a day:

    Table 3 Limit value expressed as a minimum sulphur recovery rate of sulphur recovery units

    Plant type

    Minimum sulphur recovery rate1) (%)

    New plant

     

    99.5

    Existing plant

     

    98.5

    X Noot
    1)

    The sulphur recovery rate is the percentage of the imported H2S converted to elemental sulphur as a yearly average.

  • 10. Titanium dioxide production:

    Table 4 Limit values for SOx emissions released from titanium dioxide production (annual average)

    Plant type

    ELV for SOx (expressed as SO2) (kg/t of TiO2)

    Sulphate process, total emission

    6

    Chloride process, total emission

    1.7

B. Canada

  • 11. Limit values for controlling emissions of sulphur oxides will be determined for stationary sources, as appropriate, taking into account information on available control technologies, limit values applied in other jurisdictions, and the documents below:

    • a) Order Adding Toxic Substances to Schedule 1 to the Canadian Environmental Act, 1999. SOR/2011-34;

    • b) Proposed Regulation, Order Adding Toxic Substances to Schedule 1 to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

    • c) New Source Emission Guidelines for Thermal Electricity Generation;

    • d) National Emission Guidelines for Stationary Combustion Turbines. PN1072; and

    • e) Operating and Emission Guidelines for Municipal Solid Waste Incinerators. PN1085.

C. United States of America

  • 12. Limit values for controlling emissions of sulphur dioxide from stationary sources in the following stationary source categories, and the sources to which they apply, are specified in the following documents:

    • a) Electric Utility Steam Generating Units – 40 Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.) Part 60, Subpart D, and Subpart Da;

    • b) Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam Generating Units – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart Db, and Subpart Dc;

    • c) Sulphuric Acid Plants – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart H;

    • d) Petroleum Refineries – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart J and Subpart Ja;

    • e) Primary Copper Smelters – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart P;

    • f) Primary Zinc Smelters – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart Q;

    • g) Primary Lead Smelters – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart R;

    • h) Stationary Gas Turbines – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart GG;

    • i) Onshore Natural Gas Processing – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart LLL;

    • j) Municipal Waste Combustors – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart Ea, and Subpart Eb;

    • k) Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart Ec;

    • l) Stationary Combustion Turbines – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart KKKK;

    • m) Small Municipal Waste Combustors – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart AAAA;

    • n) Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Combustors – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart CCCC; and

    • o) Other Solid Waste Combustors – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart EEEE.

R.

Annex V

For annex V the following text is substituted:

Limit values for emissions of nitrogen oxides from stationary sources
  • 1. Section A applies to Parties other than Canada and the United States of America, section B applies to Canada and section C applies to the United States of America.

A. Parties other than Canada and the United States of America

  • 2. For the purpose of this section “emission limit value” (ELV) means the quantity of NOx (sum of NO and NO2, expressed as NO2) contained in the waste gases from an installation that is not to be exceeded. Unless otherwise specified, it shall be calculated in terms of mass of NOx per volume of the waste gases (expressed as mg/m3), assuming standard conditions for temperature and pressure for dry gas (volume at 273.15 K, 101.3 kPa). With regard to the oxygen content of the waste gas, the values given in the tables below for each source category shall apply. Dilution for the purpose of lowering concentrations of pollutants in waste gases is not permitted. Start-up, shutdown and maintenance of equipment are excluded.

  • 3. Emissions shall be monitored in all cases via measurements of NOx or through calculations or a combination of both achieving at least the same accuracy.

    Compliance with ELVs shall be verified through continuous or discontinuous measurements, type approval, or any other technically sound method including verified calculation methods. In case of continuous measurements, compliance with the ELVs is achieved if the validated monthly emission average does not exceed the limit values. In case of discontinuous measurements or other appropriate determination or calculation procedures, compliance with the ELVs is achieved if the mean value based on an appropriate number of measurements under representative conditions does not exceed the ELV. The inaccuracy of the measurement methods may be taken into account for verification purposes.

  • 4. Monitoring of relevant polluting substances and measurements of process parameters, as well as the quality assurance of automated measuring systems and the reference measurements to calibrate those systems, shall be carried out in accordance with CEN standards. If CEN standards are not available, ISO standards or national or international standards which will ensure the provision of data of an equivalent scientific quality shall apply.

  • 5. Special provisions for combustion plants referred to in paragraph 6:

    • a) A Party may derogate from the obligation to comply with the ELVs provided for in paragraph 6 in the following cases:

      • (i) For combustion plants normally using gaseous fuel which have to resort exceptionally to the use of other fuels because of a sudden interruption in the supply of gas and for this reason would need to be equipped with a waste gas purification facility;

      • (ii) For existing combustion plants not operated more than 17,500 operating hours, starting from 1 January 2016 and ending no later than 31 December 2023; or

      • (iii) For existing combustion plants other than onshore gas turbines (covered by paragraph 7) using solid or liquid fuels not operated more than 1,500 operating hours per year as a rolling average over a period of five years, instead the following ELVs apply:

        • aa) For solid fuels: 450 mg/m3;

        • bb) For liquid fuels: 450 mg/m3.

    • b) Where a combustion plant is extended by at least 50 MWth, the ELV specified in paragraph 6 for new installations shall apply to the extensional part affected by the change. The ELV is calculated as an average weighted by the actual thermal input for both the existing and the new part of the plant;

    • c) Parties shall ensure that provisions are made for procedures relating to malfunction or breakdown of the abatement equipment;

    • d) In the case of a multi-fuel firing combustion plant involving the simultaneous use of two or more fuels, the ELV shall be determined as the weighted average of the ELVs for the individual fuels, on the basis of the thermal input delivered by each fuel. Parties may apply rules by which combustion plants and process plants within a mineral oil refinery may be exempted from compliance with the individual NOx limit values set out in this annex, provided that they are complying with a bubble NOx limit value determined on the basis of the best available techniques.

  • 6. Combustion plants with a rated thermal input exceeding 50 MWth:2)

    Table 1 Limit values for NOx emissions released from combustion plants1)

    Fuel type

    Thermal input (MWth)

    ELV for NOx (mg/m3)2)

    Solid fuels

    50–100

    New plants:

    300 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels)

    450 (pulverized lignite)

    250 (biomass, peat)

       

    Existing plants:

    300 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels)

    450 (pulverized lignite)

    300 (biomass, peat)

         
     

    100–300

    New plants:

    200 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels)

    200 (biomass, peat)

       

    Existing plants:

    200 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels)

    250 (biomass, peat)

         
     

    >300

    New plants:

    150 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels) (general)

    150 (biomass, peat)

    200 (pulverized lignite)

       

    Existing plants:

    200 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels)

    200 (biomass, peat)

         

    Liquid fuels

    50–100

    New plants: 300

       

    Existing plants: 450

         
     

    100–300

    New plants:150

       

    Existing plants:

    200 (general)

    Existing plants within refineries and chemical installations:

       

    450 (for firing of distillation and conversion residues from crude oil refining for own consumption in combustion plants and for firing liquid production residue as non-commercial fuel)

         
     

    >300

    New plants: 100

       

    Existing plants:

    150 (general)

       

    Existing plants within refineries and chemical installations:

    450 (for firing of distillation and conversion residues from crude oil refining for own consumption in combustion plants and for firing liquid production residue as non-commercial fuel (< 500 MWth))

         

    Natural gas

    50–300

    New plants: 100

       

    Existing plants: 100

         
     

    >300

    New plants: 100

       

    Existing plants: 100

         

    Other gaseous fuels

    >50

    New plants: 200

     

    Existing plants: 300

    X Noot
    1)

    In particular, the ELVs shall not apply to:

    • Plants in which the products of combustion are used for direct heating, drying, or any other treatment of objects or materials;

    • Post-combustion plants designed to purify the waste gases by combustion which are not operated as independent combustion plants;

    • Facilities for the regeneration of catalytic cracking catalysts;

    • Facilities for the conversion of hydrogen sulphide into sulphur;

    • Reactors used in the chemical industry;

    • Coke battery furnaces;

    • Cowpers;

    • Recovery boilers within installations for the production of pulp;

    • Waste incinerators; and

    • Plants powered by diesel, petrol or gas engines or by combustion turbines, irrespective of the fuel used.

    X Noot
    2)

    The O2 reference content is 6% for solid fuels and 3% for liquid and gaseous fuels.

  • 7. Onshore combustion turbines with a rated thermal input exceeding 50 MWth: the NOx ELVs expressed in mg/m3 (at a reference O2 content of 15%) are to be applied to a single turbine. The ELVs in table 2 apply only above 70% load.

    Table 2 Limit values for NOx emissions released from onshore combustion turbines (including Combined Cycle Gas turbines (CCGT))

    Fuel type

    Thermal input (MWth)

    ELV for NOx (mg/m3)1)

    Liquid fuels

    (light and medium distillates)

    > 50

    New plants: 50

    Existing plants:

    90 (general)

    200 (plants operating less than 1,500 hours a year)

         

    Natural gas2)

    > 50

    New plants:

    50 (general)3)

    Existing plants:

    50 (general)3)4)

    150 (plants operating less than 1,500 hours per year)

         

    Other gases

    > 50

    New plants: 50

    Existing plants:

    120 (general)

    200 (plants operating less than 1,500 hours a year)

    X Noot
    1)

    Gas turbines for emergency use that operate less than 500 hours per year are not covered.

    X Noot
    2)

    Natural gas is naturally occurring methane with not more than 20% (by volume) of inert gases and other constituents.

    X Noot
    3)

    75 mg/m3 in the following cases, where the efficiency of the gas turbine is determined at ISO base load conditions:

    • Gas turbines, used in combined heat and power systems having an overall efficiency greater than 75%;

    • Gas turbines used in combined cycle plants having an annual average overall electrical efficiency greater than 55%;

    • Gas turbines for mechanical drives.

    X Noot
    4)

    For single gas turbines not falling into any of the categories mentioned under footnote 3, but having an efficiency greater than 35% – determined at ISO base load conditions – the ELV for NOx shall be 50 x η / 35 where η is the gas-turbine efficiency at ISO base load conditions expressed as a percentage.

  • 8. Cement production:

    Table 3 Limit values for NOx emissions released from cement clinker production1)

    Plant type

    ELV for NOx (mg/Nm3)

    General (existing and new installations)

    500

    Existing lepol and long rotary kilns in which no waste is co-incinerated

    800

    X Noot
    1)

    Installations for the production of cement clinker in rotary kilns with a capacity >500 Mg/day or in other furnaces with a capacity >50 Mg/day. The O2 reference content is 10%.

  • 9. Stationary engines:

    Table 4 Limit values for NOx emissions released from new stationary engines

    Engine type, power, fuel specification

    ELV1)2)3) (mg/m3)

    Gas engines > 1 MWth

     

    Spark ignited (=Otto) engines all gaseous fuels

    95 (enhanced lean burn)

    190 (Standard lean burn or rich burn with catalyst)

    Dual fuel engines > 1 MWth

     

    In gas mode (all gaseous fuels)

    In liquid mode (all liquid fuels)4)

    190

    1–20 MWth

    225

    >20 MWth

    225

    Diesel engines > 5 MWth (compression ignition)

     
       

    Slow (< 300 rpm)/ Medium (300-1,200 rpm)/ speed

     

    5–20 MWth

     

    Heavy Fuel Oil (HFO) and bio-oils

    225

    Light Fuel Oil (LFO) and Natural Gas (NG)

    190

    >20 MWth

     

    HFO and bio-oils

    190

    LFO and NG

    190

    High speed (>1,200 rpm)

    190

    Note: The reference oxygen content is 15%3)

    X Noot
    1)

    These ELVs do not apply to engines running less than 500 hours a year.

    X Noot
    2)

    Where Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) cannot currently be applied for technical and logistical reasons like on remote islands or where the availability of sufficient amounts of high quality fuel cannot be guaranteed, a transition period of 10 years after the entry into force of the present Protocol for a Party may be applied for diesel engines and dual fuel engines during which the following ELVs apply:

    • Dual fuel engines: 1,850 mg/m3 in liquid mode; 380 mg/m3 in gas mode;

    • Diesel engines – Slow (< 300 rpm) and Medium (300–1,200 rpm)/speed:

      1,300 mg/m3 for engines between 5 and 20 MWth and 1,850 mg/m3 for engines > 20 MWth;

    • Diesel engines – High speed (> 1,200 rpm): 750 mg/m3.

    X Noot
    3)

    Engines running between 500 and 1,500 operational hours per year may be exempted from compliance with these ELVs in case they are applying primary measures to limit NOx emissions and meet the ELVs set out in footnote 2);

    X Noot
    4)

    A Party may derogate from the obligation to comply with the emission limit values for combustion plants using gaseous fuel which have to resort exceptionally to the use of other fuels because of a sudden interruption in the supply of gas and for this reason would need to be equipped with a waste gas purification facility. The exception time period shall not exceed 10 days except where there it is an overriding need to maintain energy supplies.

  • 10. Iron ore sinter plants:

    Table 5 Limit values for NOx emissions released from iron ore sinter plants

    Plant type

    ELV for NOx (mg/m3)

    Sinter plants: New installation

    400

    Sinter plants: Existing installation

    400

    1) Production and processing of metals: metal ore roasting or sintering installations, installations for the production of pig iron or steel (primary or secondary fusion) including continuous casting with a capacity exceeding 2.5 Mg/hour, installations for the processing of ferrous metals (hot rolling mills > 20 Mg/hour of crude steel).

    2) As an exemption to paragraph 3, these ELVs should be considered as averaged over a substantial period of time.

  • 11. Nitric acid production:

    Table 6 Limit values for NOx emissions from nitric acid production excluding acid concentration units

    Type of installations

    ELV for NOx (mg/m3)

    New installations

    160

    Existing installations

    190

B. Canada

  • 12. Limit values for controlling emissions of NOx will be determined for stationary sources, as appropriate, taking into account information on available control technologies, limit values applied in other jurisdictions, and the documents below:

    • a) New Source Emission Guidelines for Thermal Electricity Generation;

    • b) National Emission Guidelines for Stationary Combustion Turbines. PN1072;

    • c) National Emission Guidelines for Cement Kilns. PN1284;

    • d) National Emission Guidelines for Industrial/Commercial Boilers and Heaters. PN1286;

    • e) Operating and Emission Guidelines for Municipal Solid Waste Incinerators. PN1085;

    • f) Management Plan for Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) – Phase I. PN1066; and

    • g) Operating and Emission Guidelines for Municipal Solid Waste Incinerators. PN1085.

C. United States of America

  • 13. Limit values for controlling emissions of NOx from stationary sources in the following stationary source categories, and the sources to which they apply, are specified in the following documents:

    • a) Coal-fired Utility Units – 40 Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.) Part 76;

    • b) Electric Utility Steam Generating Units – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart D, and Subpart Da;

    • c) Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam Generating Units – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart Db;

    • d) Nitric Acid Plants – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart G;

    • e) Stationary Gas Turbines – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart GG;

    • f) Municipal Waste Combustors – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart Ea, and Subpart Eb;

    • g) Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart Ec;

    • h) Petroleum Refineries – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart J, and Subpart Ja;

    • i) Stationary Internal Combustion Engines – Spark Ignition, 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart JJJJ;

    • j) Stationary Internal Combustion Engines – Compression Ignition, 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart IIII;

    • k) Stationary Combustion Turbines – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart KKKK;

    • l) Small Municipal Waste Combustors – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart AAAA;

    • m) Portland Cement –40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart F;

    • n) Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Combustors – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart CCCC; and

    • o) Other Solid Waste Combustors – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart EEEE.

S.

Annex VI

For annex VI, the following text is substituted:

Limit values for emissions of volatile organic compounds from stationary sources
  • 1. Section A applies to Parties other than Canada and the United States of America, section B applies to Canada and section C applies to the United States of America.

A. Parties other than Canada and the United States of America

  • 2. This section of the present annex covers the stationary sources of VOC emissions listed in paragraphs 8 to 22 below. Installations or parts of installations for research, development and testing of new products and processes are not covered.

    Threshold values are given in the sector-specific tables below. They generally refer to solvent consumption or emission mass flow. Where one operator carries out several activities falling under the same subheading at the same installation on the same site, the solvent consumption or emission mass flow of such activities are added together. If no threshold value is indicated, the given limit value applies to all the installations concerned.

  • 3. For the purpose of section A of the present annex:

    a) “Storage and distribution of petrol”

    means the loading of trucks, railway wagons, barges and seagoing ships at depots and mineral oil refinery dispatch stations, including vehicle refuelling at service stations;

    b) “Adhesive coating”

    means any activity in which an adhesive is applied to a surface, with the exception of adhesive coating and laminating associated with printing activity and wood and plastic lamination;

    c) “Wood and plastic lamination”

    means any activity to adhere together wood and/or plastic to produce laminated products;

    d) “Coating activity”

    means any activity in which a single or multiple application of a continuous film of coating is laid onto:

    • (i) New vehicles defined as vehicles of category M1 and of category N1 insofar as they are coated at the same installation as M1 vehicles;

    • (ii) Truck cabins, defined as the housing for the driver, and all integrated housing for the technical equipment of category N2 and N3 vehicles;

    • (iii) Vans and trucks defined as category N1, N2 and N3 vehicles, but excluding truck cabins;

    • (iv) Buses defined as category M2 and M3 vehicles;

    • (v) Other metallic and plastic surfaces including those of aeroplanes, ships, trains, etc.;

    • (vi) Wooden surfaces;

    • (vii) Textile, fabric, film and paper surfaces; and

    • (viii) Leather;

    This source category does not include the coating of substrates with metals by electrophoretic or chemical spraying techniques. If the coating activity includes a step in which the same article is printed, that printing step is considered part of the coating activity. However, printing activities operated as a separate activity are not covered by this definition. In this definition:

    • M1 vehicles are those used for the carriage of passengers and comprising not more than eight seats in addition to the driver’s seat;

    • M2 vehicles are those used for the carriage of passengers and comprising more than eight seats in addition to the driver’s seat, and having a maximum mass not exceeding 5 Mg;

    • M3 vehicles are those used for the carriage of passengers and comprising more than eight seats in addition to the driver’s seat, and having a maximum mass exceeding 5 Mg;

    • N1 vehicles are those used for the carriage of goods and having a maximum mass not exceeding 3.5 Mg;

    • N2 vehicles are those used for the carriage of goods and having a maximum mass exceeding 3.5 Mg but not exceeding 12 Mg;

    • N3 vehicles are those used for the carriage of goods and having a maximum mass exceeding 12 Mg;

    e) “Coil coating”

    means any activity where coiled steel, stainless steel, coated steel, copper alloys or aluminium strip is coated with either a film-forming or laminate coating in a continuous process;

    f) “Dry cleaning”

    means any industrial or commercial activity using VOCs in an installation to clean garments, furnishings and similar consumer goods with the exception of the manual removal of stains and spots in the textile and clothing industry;

    g) “Manufacturing of coatings, varnishes, inks and adhesives”

    means the manufacture of coating preparations, varnishes, inks and adhesives, and of intermediates as far as they are produced in the same installation by mixing pigments, resins and adhesive materials with organic solvents or other carriers. This category also includes dispersion, predispersion, realization of a certain viscosity or colour and packing the final products in containers;

    h) “Printing”

    means any activity of reproduction of text and/or images in which, with the use of an image carrier, ink is transferred onto a surface and applies to the following subactivities:

    • (i) Flexography: a printing activity using an image carrier of rubber or elastic photopolymers on which the printing inks are above the non-printing areas, using liquid inks that dry through evaporation;

    • (ii) Heat-set web offset: a web-fed printing activity using an image carrier in which the printing and non-printing areas are in the same plane, where web-fed means that the material to be printed is fed to the machine from a reel as distinct from separate sheets. The non-printing area is treated to attract water and thus reject ink. The printing area is treated to receive and transmit ink to the surface to be printed. Evaporation takes place in an oven where hot air is used to heat the printed material;

    • (iii) Publication rotogravure: rotogravure used for printing paper for magazines, brochures, catalogues or similar products, using toluene-based inks;

    • (iv) Rotogravure: a printing activity using a cylindrical image carrier in which the printing area is below the non-printing area, using liquid inks that dry through evaporation. The recesses are filled with ink and the surplus is cleaned off the non–printing area before the surface to be printed contacts the cylinder and lifts the ink from the recesses;

    • (v) Rotary screen printing: a web-fed printing process in which the ink is passed onto the surface to be printed by forcing it through a porous image carrier, in which the printing area is open and the non-printing area is sealed off, using liquid inks that dry only through evaporation. Web-fed means that the material to be printed is fed to the machine from a reel as distinct from separate sheets;

    • (vi) Laminating associated to a printing activity: the adhering of two or more flexible materials to produce laminates; and

    • (vii) Varnishing: an activity by which a varnish or an adhesive coating is applied to a flexible material for the purpose of later sealing the packaging material;

    i) “Manufacturing of pharmaceutical products”

    means chemical synthesis, fermentation, extraction, formulation and finishing of pharmaceutical products and, where carried out at the same site, the manufacture of intermediate products;

    j) “Conversion of natural or synthetic rubber”

    means any activity of mixing, crushing, blending, calendering, extruding and vulcanization of natural or synthetic rubber and additionally activities for the processing of natural or synthetic rubber to derive an end product;

    k) “Surface cleaning”

    means any activity except dry cleaning using organic solvents to remove contamination from the surface of material, including degreasing; a cleaning activity consisting of more than one step before or after any other processing step is considered as one surface-cleaning activity. The activity refers to the cleaning of the surface of products and not to the cleaning of process equipment;

    l) “Standard conditions”

    means a temperature of 273.15 K and a pressure of 101.3 kPa;

    m) “Organic compound”

    means any compound containing at least the element carbon and one or more of hydrogen, halogens, oxygen, sulphur, phosphorus, silicon or nitrogen, with the exception of carbon oxides and inorganic carbonates and bicarbonates;

    n) “Volatile organic compound” (VOC)

    means any organic compound as well as the fraction of creosote, having at 293.15 K a vapour pressure of 0.01 kPa or more, or having a corresponding volatility under the particular conditions of use;

    o) “Organic solvent”

    means any VOC which is used alone or in combination with other agents, and without undergoing a chemical change, to dissolve raw material, products or waste materials, or is used as a cleaning agent to dissolve contaminants, or as a dissolver, or as a dispersion medium, or as a viscosity adjuster, or as a surface tension adjuster, or a plasticizer, or as a preservative;

    p) “Waste gases”

    means the final gaseous discharge containing VOCs or other pollutants from a stack or from emission abatement equipment into air. The volumetric flow rates shall be expressed in m3/h at standard conditions;

    q) “Extraction of vegetable oil and animal fat and refining of vegetable oil”

    means the extraction of vegetable oil from seeds and other vegetable matter, the processing of dry residues to produce animal feed, and the purification of fats and vegetable oils derived from seeds, vegetable matter and/or animal matter;

    r) “Vehicle refinishing”

    means any industrial or commercial coating activity and associated degreasing activities performing:

    • (i) The original coating of road vehicles, or part of them, with refinishing-type materials, where this is carried out away from the original manufacturing line, or the coating of trailers (including semi-trailers);

    • (ii) Vehicle refinishing, defined as the coating of road vehicles, or part of them, carried out as part of vehicle repair, conservation or decoration outside manufacturing installations, is not covered by this annex. The products used as part of this activity are considered in annex XI;

    s) “Wood impregnation”

    means any activity giving a loading of preservative in timber;

    t) “Winding wire coating”

    means any coating activity of metallic conductors used for winding the coils in transformers and motors, etc.;

    u) “Fugitive emission”

    means any emission, not in waste gases, of VOCs into air, soil and water as well as, unless otherwise stated, solvents contained in any product; this includes uncaptured emissions of VOCs released to the outside environment via windows, doors, vents and similar openings. Fugitive emissions may be calculated on the basis of a solvent management plan (see appendix I to the present annex);

    v) “Total emission of VOCs”

    means the sum of fugitive emission of VOCs and emission of VOCs in waste gases;

    w) “Input”

    means the quantity of organic solvents and their quantity in preparations used when carrying out a process, including the solvents recycled inside and outside the installation, and which are counted every time they are used to carry out the activity;

    x) “Emission limit value” (ELV)

    means the maximum quantity of VOC (except methane) emitted from an installation which is not to be exceeded during normal operation. For waste gases, it is expressed in terms of mass of VOC per volume of waste gases (expressed as mg C/m3 unless specified otherwise), assuming standard conditions for temperature and pressure for dry gas. Gas volumes that are added to the waste gas for cooling or dilution purposes shall not be considered when determining the mass concentration of the pollutant in the waste gases. Emission limit values for waste gases are indicated as ELVc; emission limit values for fugitive emissions are indicated as ELVf;

    y) “Normal operation”

    means all periods of operation except start-up and shutdown operations and maintenance of equipment;

    z) “Substances harmful to human health”

    are subdivided into two categories:

    • (i) Halogenated VOCs that have possible risk of irreversible effects; or

    • (ii) Hazardous substances that are carcinogens, mutagens or toxic to reproduction or that may cause cancer, may cause heritable genetic damage, may cause cancer by inhalation, may impair fertility or may cause harm to the unborn child:

      • aa) “Footwear manufacture” means any activity of producing complete footwear or part of it;

      • bb) “Solvent consumption” means the total input of organic solvents into an installation per calendar year, or any other 12-month period, less any VOCs that are recovered for reuse.

  • 4. The following requirements shall be satisfied:

    • a) Emissions shall be monitored in all cases via measurements or through calculations4) achieving at least the same accuracy. Compliance with ELVs shall be verified through continuous or discontinuous measurements, type approval, or any other technically sound method. For the emissions in waste gases, in case of continuous measurements, compliance with the ELVs is achieved if the validated daily emission average does not exceed the ELVs. In case of discontinuous measurements or other appropriate determination procedures, compliance with the ELVs is achieved if the average of all the readings or other procedures within one monitoring exercise does not exceed the limit values. The inaccuracy of the measurement methods may be taken into account for verification purposes. The fugitive and total ELVs apply as annual averages;

    • b) The concentrations of air pollutants in gas-carrying ducts shall be measured in a representative way. Monitoring of relevant polluting substances and measurements of process parameters, as well as the quality assurance of automated systems and the reference measurements to calibrate those systems, shall be carried out in accordance with CEN standards. If CEN standards are not available, ISO standards, national or international standards which will ensure the provision of data of an equivalent scientific quality shall apply.

  • 5. The following ELVs apply for waste gases containing substances harmful to human health:

    • a) 20 mg/m3 (expressed as the mass sum of individual compounds) for discharges of halogenated VOCs, which are assigned the following risk phrases: “suspected of causing cancer” and/or “suspected of causing genetic defects”, where the mass flow of the sum of the considered compounds is greater than or equal to 100 g/h; and

    • b) 2 mg/m3 (expressed as the mass sum of individual compounds) for discharges of VOCs, which are assigned the following risk phrases: “may cause cancer”, “may cause genetic defects”, “may cause cancer by inhalation”, “may damage fertility”, “may damage the unborn child”, where the mass flow of the sum of the considered compounds is greater than or equal to 10 g/h.

  • 6. For the source categories listed in paragraphs 9 to 22 where it is demonstrated that for an individual installation compliance with the fugitive emission limit value (ELVf) is not technically and economically feasible, a Party may exempt that installation provided that significant risks to human health or the environment are not expected and that the best available techniques are used.

  • 7. The limit values for VOC emissions for the source categories defined in paragraph 3 shall be as specified in paragraphs 8 to 22 below.

  • 8. Storage and distribution of petrol:

    • a) Petrol storage installations at terminals, when above the threshold values mentioned in table 1, must be either:

      • (i) Fixed-roof tanks, which are connected to a vapour recovery unit meeting the ELVs set out in table 1; or

      • (ii) Designed with a floating roof, either external or internal, equipped with primary and secondary seals meeting the reduction efficiency set out in table 1;

    • b) As a derogation from the above-mentioned requirements, fixed-roof tanks, which were in operation prior to 1 January 1996 and which are not connected to a vapour recovery unit, must be equipped with a primary seal which is achieving a reduction efficiency of 90%.

    Table 1 Limit values for VOC emissions from the storage and distribution of petrol, excluding the loading of seagoing ships (stage I)

    Activity

    Threshold value

    ELV or reduction efficiency

    Loading and unloading of mobile container at terminals

    5,000 m3 petrol throughput annually

    10g VOC/m3 including methane1)

         

    Storage installations at terminals

    Existing terminals or tank farms with a petrol throughput of 10,000 Mg/year or more

    New terminals (without thresholds except for terminals located in small remote islands with a throughput less than 5,000 Mg/year)

    95 wt-%2)

         

    Service stations

    Petrol throughput larger than 100 m3/year

    0.01wt-% of the throughput3)

    X Noot
    1)

    The vapour displaced by the filling of petrol storage tanks shall be displaced either into other storage tanks or into abatement equipment meeting the limit values in the table above.

    X Noot
    2)

    Reduction efficiency expressed in % compared to a comparable fixed-roof tank with no vapour-containment controls, i.e., with only a vacuum/pressure relief valve.

    X Noot
    3)

    Vapours displaced by the delivery of petrol into storage installations at service stations and in fixed-roof tanks used for the intermediate storage of vapours must be returned through a vapour-tight connection line to the mobile container delivering the petrol. Loading operations may not take place unless the arrangements are in place and properly functioning.

    Under these conditions, no additional monitoring of the compliance with the limit value is required.

    Table 2 Limit values for VOC emissions for car refuelling at service station (stage II)

    Threshold values

    Minimum vapour capture efficiency wt-%1)

    New service station if its actual or intended throughput is greater than 500 m3 per annum

    Existing service station if its actual or intended throughput is greater than 3,000 m3 per annum as of 2019

    Equal to or greater than 85% wt-% with a vapour / petrol ration equal to or greater than 0.95 but less than or equal to 1.05 (v/v).

    Existing service station if its actual or intended throughput is greater than 500 m3 per annum and which undergoes a major refurbishment

     
    X Noot
    1)

    The capture efficiency of the systems has to be certified by the manufacturer in accordance with relevant technical standards or type approval procedures.

  • 9. Adhesive coating:

    Table 3 Limit values for adhesive coating

    Activity and threshold

    ELV for VOC (daily for ELVc and yearly for ELVf and total ELV)

    Footwear manufacture (solvent consumption > 5 Mg/year)

    251) g VOC / pair of shoes

       

    Other adhesive coating (solvent consumption 5–15 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 50 mg2) C/m3

    ELVf = 25 wt-% or less of the solvent input

     

    Or total ELV of 1.2 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       

    Other adhesive coating (solvent consumption 15–200 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 50 mg2) C/m3

    ELVf = 20 wt-% or less of the solvent input

     

    Or total ELV of 1 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       

    Other adhesive coating (solvent consumption > 200 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 50 mg3) C/m3

    ELVf = 15 wt-% or less of the solvent input

     

    Or total ELV of 0.8 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

    X Noot
    1)

    Total ELVs are expressed in grams of solvent emitted per pair of complete footwear produced.

    X Noot
    2)

    If techniques are used which allow reuse of recovered solvent, the limit value shall be 150 mg C/m3.

    X Noot
    3)

    If techniques are used which allow reuse of recovered solvent, the limit value shall be 100 mg C/m3.

  • 10. Wood and plastic lamination:

    Table 4 Limit values for wood and plastic lamination

    Activity and threshold

    ELV for VOC (yearly)

    Wood and plastic laminating (solvent consumption > 5 Mg/year)

    Total ELV of 30 g VOC/m2 of final product

  • 11. Coating activities (vehicle coating industry):

    Table 5 Limit values for coating activities in the vehicle industry

    Activity and threshold

    ELV for VOC1) (yearly for total ELV)

    Manufacture of cars (M1, M2) (solvent consumption > 15 Mg/year and ≤ 5,000 coated items a year or > 3,500 chassis built)

    90 g VOC/m2 or 1.5 kg/ body + 70 g/m2

       

    Manufacture of cars (M1, M2) (solvent consumption 15–200 Mg/year and > 5,000 coated items a year)

    Existing installations: 60g VOC/m2 or 1.9 kg/ body + 41 g/m2

    New installations: 45 g VOC/m2 or 1.3 kg/body + 33 g/m2

       

    Manufacture of cars (M1, M2) (solvent consumption > 200 Mg/year and > 5,000 coated items a year)

    35 g VOC/m2 or 1 kg/body + 26 g/m22)

       

    Manufacture of truck cabins (N1, N2, N3) (solvent consumption > 15 Mg/year and ≤ 5,000 coated items/year)

    Existing installations: 85 g VOC/m2

    New installations: 65 g VOC/m2

       

    Manufacture of truck cabins (N1, N2, N3) (solvent consumption 15–200 Mg/year and > 5,000 coated items a year)

    Existing installations: 75 g VOC/m2

    New installations: 55 g VOC/m2

       

    Manufacture of truck cabins (N1, N2, N3) (solvent consumption > 200 Mg/year and > 5,000 coated items a year)

    55 g VOC/m2

       

    Manufacture of trucks and vans (solvent consumption > 15 Mg/year and ≤ 2,500 coated items a year)

    Existing installations: 120 g VOC/m2

    New installations: 90 g VOC/m2

       

    Manufacture of trucks and vans (solvent consumption 15–200 Mg/year and > 2,500 coated items a year)

    Existing installations: 90 g VOC/m2

    New installations: 70 g VOC/m2

       

    Manufacture of trucks and vans (solvent consumption > 200 Mg/year and > 2,500 coated items a year)

    50 g VOC/m2

       

    Manufacture of buses (solvent consumption > 15 Mg/year and ≤ 2,000 coated items a year)

    Existing installations: 290 g VOC/m2

    New installations: 210 g VOC/m2

       

    Manufacture of buses (solvent consumption 15–200 Mg/year and > 2,000 coated items a year)

    Existing installations: 225 g VOC/m2

    New installations: 150 g VOC/m2

       

    Manufacture of buses (solvent consumption > 200 Mg/year and > 2,000 coated items a year)

    150 g VOC/m2

    X Noot
    1)

    The total limit values are expressed in terms of mass of organic solvent (g) emitted in relation to the surface area of product (m2). The surface area of the product is defined as the surface area calculated from the total electrophoretic coating area and the surface area of any parts that might be added in successive phases of the coating process which are coated with the same coatings. The surface of the electrophoretic coating area is calculated using the formula: (2 x total weight of product shell)/(average thickness of metal sheet x density of metal sheet). The total ELVs defined in the table above refer to all process stages carried out at the same installation from electrophoretic coating, or any other kind of coating process through the final wax and polish of top-coating inclusive, as well as solvent used in cleaning of process equipment, including spray booths and other fixed equipment, both during and outside of production time.

    X Noot
    2)

    For existing plants achieving these levels may entail cross-media effects, high capital costs and long payback periods. Major step decreases in VOC emissions necessitate changing the type of paint system and/or the paint application system and/or the drying system and this usually involves either a new installation or a complete refurbishment of a paint shop and requires significant capital investment.

  • 12. Coating activities (metal, textile, fabric, film, plastic, paper and wooden surfaces coating):

    Table 6 Limit values for coating activities in various industrial sectors

    Activity and threshold

    ELV for VOC (daily for ELVc and yearly for ELVf and total ELV)

    Wood coating (solvent consumption 15–25 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 1001) mg C/m3

    ELVf = 25 wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 1.6 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       

    Wood coating (solvent consumption 25–200 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 50 mg C/m3 for drying and 75 mg C/m3 for coating

    ELVf = 20 wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 1 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       

    Wood coating (solvent consumption > 200 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 50 mg C/m3 for drying and 75 mg C/m3 for coating

    ELVf = 15 wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 0.75 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       

    Coating of metal and plastics (solvent consumption 5–15 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 1001)2) mg C/m3

    ELVf = 252) wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 0.6 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       

    Other coating, including textile, fabric film and paper (excluding web screen printing for textiles, see printing) (solvent consumption 5–15 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 1001)2) mg C/m3

    ELVf = 252) wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 1.6 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       

    Textile, fabric, film and paper coating (excluding web screen printing for textiles, see printing) (solvent consumption > 15 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 50 mg C/m3 for drying and 75 mg C/m3 for coating2)3)

    ELVf = 202) wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 1 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       

    Coating of plastic workpieces (solvent consumption 15–200 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 50 mg C/m3 for drying and 75 mg C/m3 for coating2)

    ELVf = 202) wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 0.375 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       

    Coating of plastic workpieces (solvent consumption > 200 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 50 mg C/m3 for drying and 75 mg C/m3 for coating2)

    ELVf = 202) wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 0.35 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       

    Coating of metal surfaces (solvent consumption 15–200 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 50 mg C/m3 for drying and 75 mg C/m3 for coating2)

    ELVf = 202) wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 0.375 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

     

    Exception for coatings in contact with food:

    Total ELV of 0.5825 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       

    Coating of metal surfaces (solvent consumption >200 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 50 mg C/m3 for drying and 75 mg C/m3 for coating2)

    ELVf = 202) wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 0.33 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

     

    Exception for coatings in contact with food:

    Total ELV of 0.5825 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

    X Noot
    1)

    Limit value applies to coating applications and drying processes operated under contained conditions.

    X Noot
    2)

    If contained coating conditions are not possible (boat construction, aircraft coating, etc.), installations may be granted exemption from these values. The reduction scheme is then to be used, unless this option is not technically and economically feasible. In this case, the best available technique is used.

    X Noot
    3)

    If, for textile coating, techniques are used which allow reuse of recovered solvents, the limit value shall be 150 mg C/m3 for drying and coating together.

  • 13. Coating activities (leather and winding wire coating):

    Table 7 Limit values for leather and winding wire coating

    Activity and threshold

    ELV for VOC (yearly for total ELV)

    Leather coating in furnishing and particular leather goods used as small consumer goods like bags, belts, wallets, etc. (solvent consumption > 10 Mg/year)

    Total ELV of 150 g/m2

       

    Other leather coating (solvent consumption 10–25 Mg/year)

    Total ELV of 85 g/m2

       

    Other leather coating (solvent consumption > 25 Mg/year)

    Total ELV of 75 g/m2

       

    Winding wire coating (solvent consumption > 5 Mg/year)

    Total ELV of 10 g/kg applies for installations where average diameter of wire ≤ 0,1 mm

       
     

    Total ELV of 5 g/kg applies for all other installations

  • 14. Coating activities (coil coating):

    Table 8 Limit values for coil coating

    Activity and threshold

    ELV for VOC (daily for ELVc and yearly for ELVf and total ELV)

    Existing installation (solvent consumption 25–200 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 50 mg1) C/m3

    ELVf = 10 wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 0.45 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       

    Existing installation (solvent consumption > 200 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 50 mg1) C/m3

    ELVf = 10 wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 0.45 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       

    New installation (solvent consumption 25–200 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 50 mg C/m31)

    ELVf = 5 wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 0.3 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       

    New installation (solvent consumption > 200 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 50 mg1) C/m3

    ELVf = 5 wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 0.3 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

    X Noot
    1)

    If techniques are used which allow reuse of recovered solvent, the limit value shall be 150 mg C/m3.

  • 15. Dry cleaning:

    Table 9 Limit values for dry cleaning

    Activity

    ELV for VOC1)2) (yearly for total ELV)

    New and existing installations

    Total ELV of 20 g VOC/kg

    X Noot
    1)

    Limit value for total emissions of VOCs calculated as mass of emitted VOC per mass of cleaned and dried product.

    X Noot
    2)

    This emission level can be achieved by using at least type IV machines or more efficient ones.

  • 16. Manufacturing of coatings, varnishes, inks and adhesives:

    Table 10 Limit values form manufacturing of coatings, varnishes, inks and adhesives

    Activity and threshold

    ELV for VOC (daily for ELVc and yearly for ELVf and total ELV)

    New and existing installations with solvent consumption between 100 and 1,000 Mg/year

    ELVc = 150 mg C/m3

    ELVf1) = 5 wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 5 wt-% or less of the solvent input

       

    New and existing installations with solvent consumption > 1,000 Mg/year

    ELVc = 150 mg C/m3

    ELVf1) = 3 wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 3 wt-% or less of the solvent input

    X Noot
    1)

    The fugitive limit value does not include solvents sold as part of a preparation in a sealed container.

  • 17. Printing activities (flexography, heat-set web offset, publication rotogravure, etc.):

    Table 11 Limit values for printing activities

    Activity and threshold

    ELV for VOC (daily for ELVc and yearly for ELVf and total ELV)

    Heat-set offset (solvent consumption 15–25 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 100 mg C/m3

    ELVf = 30 wt-% or less of the solvent input1)

       

    Heat-set offset (solvent consumption 25–200 Mg/year)

    New and existing installations

    ELVc = 20 mg C/m3

    ELVf = 30 wt-% or less of the solvent input1)

       

    Heat-set offset (solvent consumption >200 Mg/year)

    For new and upgraded presses

    Total ELV = 10 wt-% or less of the ink consumption1)

    For existing presses

    Total ELV = 15 wt-% or less of the ink consumption1)

       

    Publication gravure (solvent consumption 25–200 Mg/year)

    For new installations

    ELVc = 75 mg C/m3

    ELVf = 10 wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 0.6 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       
     

    For existing installations

    ELVc = 75 mg C/m3

    ELVf = 15 wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 0.8 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       

    Publication gravure (solvent consumption > 200 Mg/year)

    For new installations

    Total ELV = 5 wt-% or less of the solvent input

     

    For existing installations

    Total ELV = 7 wt-% or less of the solvent input

       

    Packaging rotogravure and flexography (solvent consumption 15–25 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 100 mg C/m3

    ELVf = 25 wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 1.2 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       

    Packaging rotogravure and flexography (solvent consumption 25–200 Mg/year) and rotary screen printing (solvent consumption > 30 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 100 mg C/m3

    ELVf = 20 wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or total ELV of 1.0 kg or less of VOC/kg of solid input

       

    Packaging rotogravure and flexography (solvent consumption > 200 Mg/year)

    For plants with all machines connected to oxidation:

    Total ELV = 0.5 kg VOC/kg of solid input

    For plants with all machines connected to carbon adsorption:

    Total ELV = 0.6 kg VOC/kg of solid input

    For existing mixed plants where some existing machines may not be attached to an incinerator or solvent recovery:

    Emissions from the machines connected to oxidizers or carbon adsorption are below the emission limits of 0.5 or 0.6 kg VOC/kg of solid input respectively.

    For machines not connected to gas treatment: use of low solvent or solvent free products, connection to waste gas treatment when there is spare capacity and preferentially run high solvent content work on machines connected to waste gas treatment.

    Total emissions below 1.0 kg VOC/kg of solid input

    X Noot
    1)

    Residual solvent in the finished product is not taken into account in the calculation of the fugitive emission.

  • 18. Manufacturing of pharmaceutical products:

    Table 12 Limit values for manufacturing of pharmaceutical products

    Activity and threshold

    ELV for VOC (daily for ELVc and yearly for ELVf and total ELV)

    New installations (solvent consumption > 50 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 20 mg C/m3 1)2)

    ELVf = 5 wt-% or less of the solvent input2)

    Existing installations (solvent consumption > 50 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 20 mg C/m3 1)3)

    ELVf = 15 wt-% or less of the solvent input3)

    X Noot
    1)

    If techniques are used which allow reuse of recovered solvents, the limit value shall be 150 mg C/m3.

    X Noot
    2)

    A total limit value of 5% of solvent input may be applied instead of applying ELVc and ELVf.

    X Noot
    3)

    A total limit value of 15% of solvent input may be applied instead of applying ELVc and ELVf.

  • 19. Conversion of natural or synthetic rubber:

    Table 13 Limit values for conversion of natural or synthetic rubber

    Activity and threshold

    ELV for VOC (daily for ELVc and yearly for ELVf and total ELV)

    New and existing installations: conversion of natural or synthetic rubber (solvent consumption > 15 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 20 mg C/m31)

    ELVf = 25 wt-% of solvent input2)

    Or total ELV = 25 wt-% of solvent input

    X Noot
    1)

    If techniques are used which allow reuse of recovered solvent, the limit value shall be 150 mg C/m3.

    X Noot
    2)

    The fugitive limit does not include solvents sold as part of a preparation in a sealed container.

  • 20. Surface cleaning:

    Table 14 Limit values for surface cleaning

    Activity and threshold

    Threshold value for solvent consumption (Mg/year)

    ELV for VOC (daily for ELVc and yearly for ELVf and total ELV)

    Surface cleaning using substances mentioned

    1–5

    ELVc = 20 mg expressed as the mass sum of individual compounds/ m3

    ELVf = 15 wt-% of solvent input

    in paragraph 3 (z) (i) of this annex

    > 5

    ELVc = 20 mg expressed as the mass sum of individual compounds/m3

    ELVf = 10 wt-% of solvent input

    Other surface cleaning

    2–10

    ELVc = 75 mg C/m31)

    ELVf = 20 wt-% of solvent input

     

    > 10

    ELVc = 75 mg C/m31)

    ELVf = 15 wt-%1) of solvent input

    X Noot
    1)

    Installations for which the average organic solvent content of all cleaning material used does not exceed 30 wt-% are exempt from applying these values.

  • 21. Vegetable oil and animal fat extraction and vegetable oil refining processes:

    Table 15 Limit values for extraction of vegetable and animal fat and refining of vegetable oil

    Activity and threshold

    ELV for VOC (yearly for total ELV)

    New and existing installations (solvent consumption > 10 Mg/year)

    Total ELV (kg VOC/Mg product)

     
     

    Animal fat:

    1.5

     

    Castor:

    3.0

     

    Rape seed:

    1.0

     

    Sunflower seed:

    1.0

     

    Soya beans (normal crush):

    0.8

     

    Soya beans (white flakes):

    1.2

     

    Other seeds and vegetable material:

    3.01)

     

    All fractionation processes, excluding degumming:2)

    1.5

     

    Degumming:

    4.0

    X Noot
    1)

    Limit values for total emissions of VOCs from installations treating single batches of seeds or other vegetable material shall be set case by case by a Party on the basis of the best available techniques.

    X Noot
    2)

    The removal of gum from the oil.

  • 22. Impregnation of wood:

    Table 16 Limit values for impregnation of wood

    Activity and threshold

    ELV for VOC (daily for ELVc and yearly for ELVf and total ELV)

    Wood impregnation (solvent consumption 25–200 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 1001) mg C/m3

    ELVf = 45 wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or 11 kg or less of VOC/m3

       

    Wood impregnation (solvent consumption > 200 Mg/year)

    ELVc = 1001) mg C/m3

    ELVf = 35 wt-% or less of the solvent input

    Or 9 kg or less of VOC/m3

    X Noot
    1)

    Does not apply to impregnation with creosote.

B. Canada

  • 23. Limit values for controlling emissions of VOCs will be determined for stationary sources, as appropriate, taking into account information on available control technologies, limit values applied in other jurisdictions, and the documents below:

    • a) VOC Concentration Limits for Architectural Coatings Regulations – SOR/2009-264;

    • b) VOC Concentration Limits for Automotive Refinishing Products. SOR/2009-197;

    • c) Proposed regulations for VOC Concentrations Limits for Certain Products;

    • d) Guidelines for the Reduction of Ethylene Oxide Releases from Sterilization Applications;

    • e) Environmental Guideline for the Control of Volatile Organic Compounds Process Emissions from New Organic Chemical Operations. PN1108;

    • f) Environmental Code of Practice for the Measurement and Control of Fugitive VOC Emissions from Equipment Leaks. PN1106;

    • g) A Program to Reduce Volatile Organic Compound Emissions by 40 Percent from Adhesives and Sealants. PN1116;

    • h) A Plan to Reduce VOC Emissions by 20 Percent from Consumer Surface Coatings. PN1114;

    • i) Environmental Guidelines for Controlling Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from Aboveground Storage Tanks. PN1180;

    • j) Environmental Code of Practice for Vapour Recovery during Vehicle Refueling at Service Stations and Other Gasoline Dispersing Facilities. PN1184;

    • k) Environmental Code of Practice for the Reduction of Solvent Emissions from Commercial and Industrial Degreasing Facilities. PN1182;

    • l) New Source Performance Standards and Guidelines for the Reduction of Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Canadian Automotive Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) Coating Facilities. PN1234;

    • m) Environmental Guideline for the Reduction of Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from the Plastics Processing Industry. PN1276;

    • n) National Action Plan for the Environmental Control of Ozone- Depleting Substances (ODS) and Their Halocarbon Alternatives. PN1291;

    • o) Management Plan for Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) – Phase I. PN1066;

    • p) Environmental Code of Practice for the Reduction of Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from the Commercial/Industrial Printing Industry. PN1301;

    • q) Recommended CCME5) Standards and Guidelines for the Reduction of VOC Emissions from Canadian Industrial Maintenance Coatings. PN1320; and

    • r) Guidelines for the Reduction of VOC Emissions in the Wood Furniture Manufacturing Sector. PN1338.

C. United States of America

  • 24. Limit values for controlling emissions of VOCs from stationary sources in the following stationary source categories, and the sources to which they apply, are specified in the following documents:

    • a) Storage Vessels for Petroleum Liquids – 40 Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.) Part 60, Subpart K, and Subpart Ka;

    • b) Storage Vessels for Volatile Organic Liquids – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart Kb;

    • c) Petroleum Refineries – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart J;

    • d) Surface Coating of Metal Furniture – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart EE;

    • e) Surface Coating for Automobile and Light Duty Trucks — 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart MM;

    • f) Publication Rotogravure Printing – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart QQ;

    • g) Pressure Sensitive Tape and Label Surface Coating Operations – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart RR;

    • h) Large Appliance, Metal Coil and Beverage Can Surface Coating – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart SS, Subpart TT and Subpart WW;

    • i) Bulk Gasoline Terminals – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart XX;

    • j) Rubber Tire Manufacturing – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart BBB;

    • k) Polymer Manufacturing – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart DDD;

    • l) Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart FFF;

    • m) Petroleum Refinery Equipment Leaks and Wastewater Systems – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart GGG and Subpart QQQ;

    • n) Synthetic Fiber Production – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart HHH;

    • o) Petroleum Dry Cleaners – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart JJJ;

    • p) Onshore Natural Gas Processing Plants – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart KKK;

    • q) SOCMI Equipment Leaks, Air Oxidation Units, Distillation Operations and Reactor Processes – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart VV, Subpart III, Subpart NNN and Subpart RRR;

    • r) Magnetic Tape Coating – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart SSS;

    • s) Industrial Surface Coatings – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart TTT;

    • t) Polymeric Coatings of Supporting Substrates Facilities – 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart VVV;

    • u) Stationary Internal Combustion Engines – Spark Ignition, 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart JJJJ;

    • v) Stationary Internal Combustion Engines – Compression Ignition, 40 C.F.R. Part 60, Subpart IIII and

    • w) New and in-use portable fuel containers — 40 C.F.R. Part 59, Subpart F.

  • 25. Limit values for controlling emissions of VOC from sources subject to National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) are specified in the following documents:

    • a) Organic HAPs from the Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart F;

    • b) Organic HAPs from the Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry: Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart G;

  • c) Organic HAPs: Equipment Leaks – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart H;

  • d) Commercial ethylene oxide sterilizers – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart O;

  • e) Bulk gasoline terminals and pipeline breakout stations – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart R;

  • f) Halogenated solvent degreasers – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart T;

  • g) Polymers and resins (Group I) – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart U;

  • h) Polymers and resins (Group II) – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart W;

  • i) Secondary lead smelters – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart X;

  • j) Marine tank vessel loading – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart Y;

  • k) Petroleum refineries — 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart CC;

  • l) Offsite waste and recovery operations – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart DD;

  • m) Magnetic tape manufacturing – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart EE;

  • n) Aerospace manufacturing – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart GG;

  • o) Oil and natural gas production – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart HH;

  • p) Ship building and ship repair – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart II;

  • q) Wood furniture – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart JJ;

  • r) Printing and publishing – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart KK;

  • s) Pulp and paper II (combustion) – C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart MM;

  • t) Storage tanks – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart OO;

  • u) Containers – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart PP;

  • v) Surface impoundments – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart QQ;

  • w) Individual drain systems – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart RR;

  • x) Closed vent systems – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart SS;

  • y) Equipment leaks: control level 1 – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart TT;

  • z) Equipment leaks: control level 2 – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart UU;

  • aa) Oil-Water Separators and Organic-Water Separators – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart VV;

  • bb) Storage Vessels (Tanks): Control Level 2 – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart WW;

  • cc) Ethylene Manufacturing Process Units – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart XX;

  • dd) Generic Maximum Achievable Control Technology Standards for several categories – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart YY;

  • ee) Hazardous waste combustors – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart EEE;

  • ff) Pharmaceutical manufacturing — 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart GGG;

  • gg) Natural Gas Transmission and Storage – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart HHH;

  • hh) Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart III;

  • ii) Polymers and Resins: group IV – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart JJJ;

  • jj) Portland cement manufacturing – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart LLL;

  • kk) Pesticide active ingredient production – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart MMM;

  • ll) Polymers and resins: group III – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart OOO;

  • mm) Polyether polyols – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart PPP;

  • nn) Secondary aluminum production – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart RRR;

  • oo) Petroleum refineries – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart UUU;

  • pp) Publicly owned treatment works – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart VVV;

  • qq) Nutritional Yeast Manufacturing – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart CCCC;

  • rr) Organic liquids distribution (non-gasoline) – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart EEEE;

  • ss) Miscellaneous organic chemical manufacturing – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart FFFF;

  • tt) Solvent Extraction for Vegetable Oil Production – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart GGGG;

  • uu) Auto and Light Duty Truck Coatings – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart IIII;

  • vv) Paper and Other Web Coating – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart JJJJ;

  • ww) Surface Coatings for Metal Cans – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart KKKK;

  • xx) Miscellaneous Metal Parts and Products Coatings – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart MMMM;

  • yy) Surface Coatings for Large Appliances – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart NNNN;

  • zz) Printing, Coating and Dyeing of Fabric – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart OOOO;

  • aaa) Surface Coating of Plastic Parts and Products – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart PPPP;

  • bbb) Surface Coating of Wood Building Products – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart QQQQ;

  • ccc) Metal Furniture Surface Coating – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart RRRR;

  • ddd) Surface coating for metal coil – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart SSSS;

  • eee) Leather finishing operations – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart TTTT;

  • fff) Cellulose products manufacturing – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart UUUU;

  • ggg) Boat manufacturing – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart VVVV;

  • hhh) Reinforced Plastics and Composites Production – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart WWWW;

  • iii) Rubber tire manufacturing – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart XXXX;

  • jjj) Stationary Combustion Engines – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart YYYY;

  • kkk) Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines: Compression Ignition – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart ZZZZ;

  • lll) Semiconductor manufacturing – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart BBBBB;

  • mmm) Iron and steel foundries – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart EEEEE;

  • nnn) Integrated iron and steel manufacturing – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart FFFFF;

  • ooo) Asphalt Processing and Roofing Manufacturing – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart LLLLL;

  • ppp) Flexible Polyurethane Foam Fabrication – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart MMMMM;

  • qqq) Engine test cells/stands – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart PPPPP;

  • rrr) Friction products manufacturing – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart QQQQQ;

  • sss) Refractory products manufacturing – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart SSSSS;

  • ttt) Hospital ethylene oxide sterilizers – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart WWWWW;

  • uuu) Gasoline Distribution Bulk Terminals, Bulk Plants, and Pipeline Facilities – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart BBBBBB;

  • vvv) Gasoline Dispensing Facilities – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart CCCCCC;

  • www) Paint Stripping and Miscellaneous Surface Coating Operations at Area Sources – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart HHHHHH;

  • xxx) Acrylic Fibers/Modacrylic Fibers Production (Area Sources) – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart LLLLLL;

  • yyy) Carbon Black Production (Area Sources) – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart MMMMMM;

  • zzz) Chemical Manufacturing Area Sources: Chromium Compounds – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart NNNNNN;

  • aaaa) Chemical Manufacturing for Area Sources – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart VVVVVV;

  • bbbb) Asphalt Processing and Roofing Manufacturing (Area Sources) – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart AAAAAAA; and

  • cccc) Paints and Allied Products Manufacturing (Area Sources) – 40 C.F.R. Part 63, Subpart CCCCCCC.

Appendix Solvent management plan

Introduction

  • 1. This appendix to the annex on limit values for emissions of VOCs from stationary sources provides guidance on carrying out a solvent management plan. It identifies the principles to be applied (paragraph 2), provides a framework for the mass balance (paragraph 3) and provides an indication of the requirements for verification of compliance (paragraph 4).

Principles

  • 2. The solvent management plan serves the following purposes:

    • a) Verification of compliance, as specified in the annex; and

    • b) Identification of future reduction options.

Definitions

  • 3. The following definitions provide a framework for the mass balance exercise:

    • a) Inputs of organic solvents:

      • I1 The quantity of organic solvents or their quantity in preparations purchased that are used as input into the process in the time frame over which the mass balance is being calculated;

      • I2 The quantity of organic solvents or their quantity in preparations recovered and reused as solvent input into the process. (The recycled solvent is counted every time it is used to carry out the activity.).

    • b) Outputs of organic solvents:

      • O1. Emission of VOCs in waste gases;

      • O2. Organic solvents lost in water, if appropriate taking into account wastewater treatment when calculating O5;

      • O3. The quantity of organic solvents that remains as contamination or residue in output of products from the process;

      • O4. Uncaptured emissions of organic solvents to air. This includes the general ventilation of rooms, where air is released to the outside environment via windows, doors, vents and similar openings;

      • O5. Organic solvents and/or organic compounds lost due to chemical or physical reactions (including, for example, those that are destroyed, e.g., by incineration or other waste-gas or wastewater, or captured, e.g., by adsorption, as long as they are not counted under O6, O7 or O8);

      • O6. Organic solvents contained in collected waste;

      • O7. Organic solvents, or organic solvents contained in preparations, that are sold or are intended to be sold as a commercially valuable product;

      • O8. Organic solvents contained in preparations recovered for reuse but not as input into the process, as long as they are not counted under O7;

      • O9. Organic solvents released in other ways.

Guidance on use of the solvent management plan for verification of compliance

  • 4. The use of the solvent management plan will be determined by the particular requirement which is to be verified, as follows:

    • a) Verification of compliance with the reduction option mentioned in paragraph 6 (a) of the annex, with a total limit value expressed in solvent emissions per unit product, or as otherwise stated in the annex:

      • (i) For all activities using the reduction option mentioned in paragraph 6 a) of the annex, the solvent management plan should be put into effect annually to determine consumption. Consumption can be calculated by means of the following equation:

        C = I1 – O8

        A parallel exercise should also be undertaken to determine solids used in coating in order to derive the annual reference emission and the target emission each year;

      • (ii) For assessing compliance with a total limit value expressed in solvent emissions per unit product or as otherwise stated in the annex, the solvent management plan should be put into effect annually to determine emission of VOCs. Emission of VOCs can be calculated by means of the following equation:

        E = F + O1

      Where F is the fugitive emission of VOC as defined in subparagraph (b) (i) below. The emission figure should be divided by the relevant product parameter;

    • b) Determination of fugitive emission of VOCs for comparison with fugitive emission values in the annex:

      • (i) Methodology: The fugitive emission of VOC can be calculated by means of the following equation:

        F = I1 – O1 – O5 – O6 – O7 – O8

        or

        F = O2 + O3 + O4 + O9

        This quantity can be determined by direct measurement of the quantities.

        Alternatively, an equivalent calculation can be made by other means, for instance by using the capture efficiency of the process. The fugitive emission value is expressed as a proportion of the input, which can be calculated by means of the following equation:

        I = I1 + I2;

      • (ii) Frequency: Fugitive emission of VOCs can be determined by a short but comprehensive set of measurements. This need not to be done again until the equipment is modified.

T.

Annex VII

For annex VII there is substituted the following:

Timescales under article 3
  • 1. The timescales for the application of the limit values referred to in article 3, paragraphs 2 and 3, shall be:

    • a) For new stationary sources, one year after the date of entry into force of the present Protocol for the Party in question; and

    • b) For existing stationary sources, one year after the date of entry into force of the present Protocol for the Party in question or 31 December 2020, whichever is the later.

  • 2. The timescales for the application of the limit values for fuels and new mobile sources referred to in article 3, paragraph 5, shall be the date of entry into force of the present Protocol for the Party in question or the dates associated with the measures specified in annex VIII, whichever is the later.

  • 3. The timescales for the application of the limit values for VOCs in products referred to in article 3, paragraph 7, shall be one year after the date of entry into force of the present Protocol for the Party in question.

  • 4. Notwithstanding paragraphs 1, 2 and 3, but subject to paragraph 5, a Party to the Convention that becomes a Party to the present Protocol between January 1, 2013, and December 31, 2019, may declare upon ratification, acceptance, approval of, or accession to, the present Protocol that it will extend any or all of the timescales for application of the limit values referred to in article 3, paragraphs 2, 3, 5 and 7, as follows:

    • a) For existing stationary sources, up to fifteen years after the date of entry into force of the present Protocol for the Party in question;

    • b) For fuels and new mobile sources, up to five years after the date of entry into force of the present Protocol for the Party in question; and

    • c) For VOCs in products, up to five years after the date of entry into force of the present Protocol for the Party in question.

  • 5. A Party that has made an election pursuant to article 3bis of the present Protocol with respect to annex VI and/or VIII may not also make a declaration pursuant to paragraph 4 applicable to the same annex.

U.

Annex VIII

For annex VIII the following text is substituted:

Limit values for fuels and new mobile sources

Introduction

  • 1. Section A applies to Parties other than Canada and the United States of America, section B applies to Canada and section C applies to the United States of America.

  • 2. This annex specifies emission limit values for NOx, expressed as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) equivalents, for hydrocarbons, most of which are volatile organic compounds, for carbon monoxide (CO) and for particulate matter as well as environmental specifications for marketed fuels for vehicles.

  • 3. The timescales for applying the limit values in this annex are laid down in annex VII.

A. Parties other than Canada and the United States of America

Passenger cars and light-duty vehicles

  • 4. Limit values for power-driven vehicles with at least four wheels and used for the carriage of passengers (category M) and goods (category N) are given in table 1.

Heavy-duty vehicles

  • 5. Limit values for engines for heavy-duty vehicles are given in tables 2 and 3 on the applicable test procedures.

Compression-ignition (CI) and spark-ignition (SI) non-road vehicles and machines

  • 6. Limit values for agricultural and forestry tractors and other non-road vehicle/machine engines are listed in tables 4 to 6.

  • 7. Limit values for locomotives and railcars are listed in tables 7 and 8.

  • 8. Limit values for inland waterway vessels are listed in table 9.

  • 9. Limit values for recreational crafts are listed in table 10.

Motorcycles and mopeds

  • 10. Limit values for motorcycles and mopeds are given in tables 11 and 12.

Fuel quality

  • 11. Environmental quality specifications for petrol and diesel are given in tables 13 and 14.

Table 1 Limit values for passenger cars and light-duty vehicles
       

Limit values1)

       

Carbon monoxide

Total hydrocarbons (HC

NMVOC

Nitrogen oxides

Hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides combined

Particulate matter

Number of particles1) (P)

       

L1 (g/km)

L2 (g/km)

L3 (g/km)

L4 (g/km)

L2 + L4 (g/km)

L5 (g/km)

L6(#/km)

Category

Class, application date*

Reference mass (RW) (kg)

Petrol

Diesel

Petrol

Diesel

Petrol

Diesel

Petrol

Diesel

Petrol

Diesel

Petrol

Diesel

Petrol

Diesel

 

M2)

1.1. 2014

All

1.0

0.50

0.10

0.068

0.06

0.18

0.23

0.0050

0.0050

6.0x1011

 

N13)

I, 1.1.2014

RW 1,305

1.0

0.50

0.10

0.068

0.06

0.18

0.23

0.0050

0.0050

6.0x1011

                                   
   

II, 1.1.2014

1,305 < RW ≤ 1,760

1.81

0.63

0.13

0.090

0.075

0.235

0.295

0.0050

0.0050

6.0x1011

                                   
   

III, 1.1.2014

1,760 < RW

2.27

0.74

0.16

0.108

0.082

0.28

0.35

0.0050

0.0050

6.0x1011

                                   
 

N2

1.1.2014

 

2.27

0.74

0.16

0.108

0.082

0.28

0.35

0.0050

0.0050

6.0x1011

Euro 5

M2)

1.9.2015

All

1.0

0.50

0.10

0.068

0.06

0.08

0.17

0.0045

0.0045

6.0x1011

6.0x1011

 

N13)

I, 1.9.2015

RW ≤1,305

1.0

0.50

0.10

0.068

0.06

0.08

0.17

0.0045

0.0045

6.0x1011

6.0x1011

Euro 6

 

II, 1.9.2016

1,305 < RW ≤ 1,760

1.81

0.63

0.13

0.090

0.075

0.105

0.195

0.0045

0.0045

6.0x1011

6.0x1011

   

III, 1.9.2016

1,760 < RW

2.27

0.74

0.16

0.108

0.082

0.125

0.215

0.0045

0.0045

6.0x1011

6.0x1011

 

N2

1.9.2016

 

2.27

0.74

0.16

0.108

0.082

0.125

0.215

0.0045

0.0045

6.0x1011

6.0x1011

* The registration, sale and entry into service of new vehicles that fail to comply with the respective limit values shall be refused as from the dates given in the column.

X Noot
1)

Test cycle specified by NEDC.

X Noot
2)

Except vehicles whose maximum mass exceeds 2,500 kg.

X Noot
3)

And those category M vehicles specified in note b.

Table 2 Limit values for heavy-duty vehicles steady-state cycle load-response tests
 

Application date

Carbon monoxide (g/kWh)

Hydro-carbons (g/kWh)

Total hydrocarbons (g/kWh)

Nitrogen oxides (g/kWh)

Particulate matter (g/kWh)

Smoke (m-1)

B2 (“EURO V”)1)

1.10.2009

1.5

0.46

2.0

0.02

0.5

“EURO VI”2)

31.12.2013

1.5

0.13

0.40

0.010

X Noot
1)

Test cycle specified by the European steady-state cycle (ESC) and the European loadresponse (ELR) tests.

X Noot
2)

Test cycle specified by the world heavy duty steady state cycle (WHSC).

Table 3 Limit values for heavy-duty vehicles – transient cycle tests
 

Application date*

Carbon monoxide (g/kWh)

Total hydrocarbons (g/kWh)

Non-methane hydrocarbons (g/kWh)

Methane1) (g/kWh)

Nitrogen oxides (g/kWh)

Particulates (g/kWh)2)

B2 “EURO V”3)

1.10.2009

4.0

0.55

1.1

2.0

0.030

“EURO VI” (CI)4)

31.12.2013

4.0

0.160

0.46

0.010

“EURO VI” (PI)4)

31.12.2013

4.0

0.160

0.50

0.46

0.010

Note: PI = Positive ignition. CI = Compression ignition.

* The registration, sale and entry into service of new vehicles that fail to comply with the respective limit values shall be refused as from the dates given in the column.

X Noot
1)

For natural gas engines only.

X Noot
2)

Not applicable to gas-fuelled engines at stage B2.

X Noot
3)

Test cycle specified by the European transient cycle (ETC) test.

X Noot
4)

Test cycle specified by the world heavy duty transient cycle (WHTC).

Table 4 Limit values for diesel engines for non-road mobile machines, agricultural and forestry tractors (stage IIIB)

Net power (P) (kW)

Application date*

Carbon monoxide (g/kWh)

Hydrocarbons (g/kWh)

Nitrogen oxides (g/kWh)

Particulate matter (g/kWh)

130 ≤ P ≤ 560

31.12.2010

3.5

0.19

2.0

0.025

75 ≤ P < 130

31.12.2011

5.0

0.19

3.3

0.025

56 ≤ P < 75

31.12.2011

5.0

0.19

3.3

0.025

37 ≤ P < 56

31.12.2012

5.0

4.71)

4.71)

0.025

* With effect from the given date and with the exception of machinery and engines intended for export to countries that are not parties to the present Protocol, Parties shall permit the registration, where applicable and the placing on the market of new engines, whether or not installed in machinery, only if they meet the respective limit values set out in the table.

X Noot
1)

Editor’s note: This figure represents the sum of hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides and was reflected in the final approved text by a single figure in a merged cell in the table. As this text does not include tables with dividing lines, the figure is repeated in each column for clarity.

Table 5 Limit values for diesel engines for non-road mobile machines, agricultural and forestry tractors (stage IV)

Net power (P) (kW)

Application date*

Carbon monoxide (g/kWh)

Hydrocarbons (g/kWh)

Nitrogen oxides (g/kWh)

Particulate matter (g/kWh)

130 ≤ P ≤ 560

31.12.2013

3.5

0.19

0.4

0.025

56 ≤ P < 130

31.12.2014

5.0

0.19

0.4

0.025

* With effect from the given date and with the exception of machinery and engines intended for export to countries that are not parties to the present Protocol, Parties shall permit the registration, where applicable and the placing on the market of new engines, whether or not installed in machinery, only if they meet the respective limit values set out in the table.

Table 6 Limit values for spark-ignition engines for non-road mobile machines
 

Hand-held engines

 

Displacement (cm3)

Carbon monoxide (g/kWh)

Sum of hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen (g/kWh)1)

Disp < 20

805

50

20 ≤ disp. < 50

805

50

Disp ≥ 50

603

72

 

Non-hand-held engines

 

Displacement (cm3)

Carbon monoxide (g/kWh)

Sum of hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen (g/kWh)

Disp < 66

610

50

66 ≤ disp. < 100

610

40

100 ≤ disp. < 225

610

16.1

Disp ≥ 225

610

12.1

Note: With the exception of machinery and engines intended for export to countries that are not Parties to the present Protocol, Parties shall permit the registration, where applicable, and the placing on the market of new engines, whether or not installed in machinery, only if they meet the respective limit values set out in the table.

X Noot
1)

The NOx emissions for all engine classes must not exceed 10 g/kWh.

Table 7 Limit values for engines used for propulsion of locomotives

Net power (P) (kW)

Carbon monoxide (g/kWh)

Hydrocarbons (g/kWh)

Nitrogen oxides (g/kWh)

Particulate matter (g/kWh)

130 < P

3.5

0.19

2.0

0.025

Note: With the exception of machinery and engines intended for export to countries that are not Parties to the present Protocol, Parties shall permit the registration, where applicable, and the placing on the market of new engines, whether or not installed in machinery, only if they meet the respective limit values set out in the table.

Table 8 Limit values for engines used for propulsion of railcars

Net power (P) (kW)

Carbon monoxide (g/kWh)

Sum of hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen (g/kWh)

Particulate matter (g/kWh)

130 < P

3.5

4.0

0.025

Table 9 Limit values for engines for propulsion of inland waterways vessels

Displacement (litres per cylinder/kW)

Carbon monoxide (g/kWh)

Sum of hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen (g/kWh)

Particulate matter (g/kWh)

Disp. < 0.9

5.0

7.5

0.4

Power ≥ 37 kW

     

0.9 ≤ disp. < 1.2

5.0

7.2

0.3

1.2 ≤ disp. < 2.5

5.0

7.2

0.2

2.5 ≤ disp. < 5.0

5.0

7.2

0.2

5.0 ≤ disp. < 15

5.0

7.8

0.27

15 ≤ disp. < 20

5.0

8.7

0.5

Power < 3,300 kW

     

15 ≤ disp. < 20

5.0

9.8

0.5

Power > 3,300 kW

     

20 ≤ disp. < 25

5.0

9.8

0.5

25 ≤ disp. < 30

5.0

11.0

0.5

Note: With the exception of machinery and engines intended for export to countries that are not Parties to the present Protocol, Parties shall permit the registration, where applicable, and the placing on the market of new engines, whether or not installed in machinery, only if they meet the respective limit values set out in the table.

Table 10 Limit values for engines in recreational crafts
 

CO (g/kWh)

Hydrocarbons (HC) (g/kWh)

   
 

CO = A +B/PnN

HC = A +B/P n N1)

   

Engine type

A

B

n

A

B

n

NOx

g/kWh

PM

g/kWh

2-stroke

150

600

1

30

100

0.75

10

Not Appl.

4-stroke

150

600

1

6

50

0.75

15

Not Appl.

CI

5

0

0

1.5

2

0.5

9.8

1

Abbreviation: Not Appl. = Not Applicable.

Note: With the exception of machinery and engines intended for export to countries that are not Parties to the present Protocol, Parties shall permit the registration, where applicable, and the placing on the market of new engines, whether or not installed in machinery, only if they meet the respective limit values set out in the table.

X Noot
1)

Where A, B and n are constants and PN is the rate engine power in kW and the emissions are measured in accordance with the harmonised standards.

Table 11 Limit values for motorcycles (> 50 cm3; > 45 km/h)

Engine size

Limit values

Motorcycle < 150 cc

HC = 0.8 g/km

 

NOx = 0.15 g/km

Motorcycle > 150 cc

HC = 0.3 g/km

 

NOx = 0.15 g/km

Note: With the exception of vehicles intended for export to countries that are not Parties to the present Protocol, Parties shall permit the registration, where applicable, and the placing on the market only if they meet the respective limit values set out in the table.

Table 12 Limit values for mopeds (<50 cm3; < 45 km/h)
 

Limit values

 
 

CO (g/km)

HC + NOx (g/km)

II

1.01)

1.2

Note: With the exception of vehicles intended for export to countries that are not Parties to the present Protocol, Parties shall permit the registration, where applicable, and the placing on the market only if they meet the respective limit values set out in the table.

X Noot
1)

For 3- and 4-wheelers, 3.5 g/km.

Table 13 Environmental specifications for marketed fuels to be used for vehicles equipped with positive-ignition engines – Type: Petrol

Parameter

 

Limits

 

Unit

Minimum

Maximum

Research octane number

 

95

Motor octane number

 

85

Reid vapour pressure, summer period1)

kPa

60

Distillation:

     

Evaporated at 100°C

% v/v

46

Evaporated at 150°C

% v/v

75

Hydrocarbon analysis:

     

- olefins

% v/v

18.02)

- aromatics

 

35

- benzene

 

1

Oxygen content

% m/m

3.7

Oxygenates:

     

- Methanol, stabilizing agents must be added

% v/v

3

- Ethanol, stabilizing agents may be necessary

% v/v

10

- Iso-propyl alcohol

% v/v

12

- Tert-butyl alcohol

% v/v

15

- Iso-butyl alcohol

% v/v

15

- Ethers containing 5 or more carbon atoms per molecule

% v/v

22

Other oxygenates3)

% v/v

15

Sulphur content

mg/kg

10

X Noot
1)

The summer period shall begin no later than 1 May and shall not end before 30 September. For Parties with arctic conditions the summer period shall begin no later than 1 June and not end before 31 August and the Reid Vapour Pressure (RVP) is limited to 70 kPa.

X Noot
2)

Except for regular unleaded petrol (minimum motor octane number (MON) of 81 and minimum research octane number (RON) of 91), for which the maximum olefin content shall be 21% v/v. These limits shall not preclude the introduction on the market of a Party of another unleaded petrol with lower octane numbers than set out here.

X Noot
3)

Other mono-alcohols with a final distillation point no higher than the final distillation point laid down in national specifications or, where these do not exist, in industrial specifications for motor fuels.

Table 14 Environmental specifications for marketed fuels to be used for vehicles equipped with compression-ignition engines – Type: Diesel fuel

Parameter

 

Limits

 

Unit

Minimum

Maximum

Cetane number

 

51

Density at 15° C

kg/m3

845

Distillation point: 95%

°C

360

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

% m/m

8

Sulphur content

mg/kg

10

B. Canada

  • 12. Limit values for controlling emissions from fuels and mobile sources will be determined, as appropriate, taking into account information on available control technologies, limit values applied in other jurisdictions, and the documents below:

    • a) Passenger Automobile and Light Truck Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations, SOR/2010–201;

    • b) Marine Spark-Ignition Engine, Vessel and Off-Road Recreational Vehicle Emission Regulations, SOR/2011–10;

    • c) Renewable Fuels Regulations, SOR/2010–189;

    • d) Regulations for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships and for Dangerous Chemicals, SOR/2007–86;

    • e) Off-Road Compression-Ignition Engine Emission Regulations, SOR/2005–32;

    • f) On-Road Vehicle and Engine Emission Regulations, SOR/2003–2;

    • g) Off-Road Small Spark-Ignition Engine Emission Regulations, SOR/2003–355;

    • h) Sulphur in Diesel Fuel Regulations, SOR/2002–254;

    • i) Gasoline and Gasoline Blend Dispensing Flow Rate Regulations SOR/2000–43;

    • j) Sulphur in Gasoline Regulations, SOR/99–236;

    • k) Benzene in Gasoline Regulations, SOR/97–493;

    • l) Gasoline Regulations, SOR/90–247;

    • m) Federal Mobile PCB Treatment and Destruction Regulations, SOR/90–5;

    • n) Environmental Code of Practice for Aboveground and Underground Storage Tank Systems Containing Petroleum and Allied Petroleum Products;

    • o) Canada-Wide Standards for Benzene, Phase 2;

    • p) Environmental Guidelines for Controlling Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from Aboveground Storage Tanks. PN 1180;

    • q) Environmental Code of Practice for Vapour Recovery in Gasoline Distribution Networks. PN 1057;

    • r) Environmental Code of Practice for Light Duty Motor Vehicle Emission Inspection and Maintenance Programs – 2nd Edition. PN 1293;

    • s) Joint Initial Actions to Reduce Pollutant Emissions that Contribute to Particulate Matter and Ground-level Ozone; and

    • t) Operating and Emission Guidelines for Municipal Solid Waste Incinerators. PN 1085.

C. United States of America

  • 13. Implementation of a mobile source emission control programme for lightduty vehicles, light-duty trucks, heavy-duty trucks and fuels to the extent required by sections 202 (a), 202 (g) and 202 (h) of the Clean Air Act, as implemented through:

    • a) Registration of fuels and fuel additives – 40 C.F.R Part 79;

    • b) Regulation of fuels and fuel additives – 40 C.F.R Part 80, including:

      Subpart A – general provisions; Subpart B – controls and prohibitions;

      Subpart D – reformulated gasoline; Subpart H – gasoline sulphur standards;

      Subpart I – motor vehicle diesel fuel; non-road, locomotive, and marine diesel fuel; and ECA marine fuel; Subpart L – gasoline benzene; and

    • c) Control of emissions from new and in-use highway vehicles and engines – 40 C.F.R Part 85 and Part 86.

  • 14. Standards for non-road engines and vehicles are specified in the following documents:

    • a) Fuel sulphur standards for non-road diesel engines – 40 C.F.R Part 80, Subpart I;

    • b) Aircraft engines – 40 C.F.R Part 87;

    • c) Exhaust emission standards for non-road diesel engines – Tier 2 and 3; 40 C.F.R Part 89;

    • d) Non-road compression-ignition engines – 40 C.F.R Part 89 and Part 1039;

    • e) Non-road and marine spark-ignition engines – 40 C.F.R Part 90, Part 91, Part 1045, and Part 1054;

    • f) Locomotives – 40 C.F.R Part 92 and Part 1033;

    • g) Marine compression-ignition engines – 40 C.F.R Part 94 and Part 1042;

    • h) New large non-road spark-ignition engines – 40 C.F.R Part 1048;

    • i) Recreational engines and vehicles – 40 C.F.R Part 1051;

    • j) Control of evaporative emissions from new and in-use non-road and stationary equipment – 40 C.F.R. Part 1060;

    • k) Engine testing procedures – 40 C.F.R Part 1065; and

    • l) General compliance provisions for non-road programs – 40 C.F.R Part 1068.

V.

Annex IX

1. The final sentence of paragraph 6 is deleted.

2. The final sentence of paragraph 9 is deleted.

3. Note 1 is deleted.

W.

Annex X

1. A new annex X is added as follows:

Annex X Limit values for emissions of particulate matter from stationary sources
  • 1. Section A applies to Parties other than Canada and the United States of America, section B applies to Canada and section C applies to the United States of America.

A. Parties other than Canada and the United States of America

  • 2. In this section only, “dust” and “total suspended particulate matter” (TSP) means the mass of particles, of any shape, structure or density, dispersed in the gas phase at the sampling point conditions which may be collected by filtration under specified conditions after representative sampling of the gas to be analysed, and which remain upstream of the filter and on the filter after drying under specified conditions.

  • 3. For the purpose of this section, “emission limit value” (ELV) means the quantity of dust and/or TSP contained in the waste gases from an installation that is not to be exceeded. Unless otherwise specified, it shall be calculated in terms of mass of pollutant per volume of the waste gases (expressed as mg/m3), assuming standard conditions for temperature and pressure for dry gas (volume at 273.15 K, 101.3 kPa). With regard to the oxygen content of waste gas, the values given in the tables below for each source category shall apply. Dilution for the purpose of lowering concentrations of pollutants in waste gases is not permitted. Start-up, shutdown and maintenance of equipment are excluded.

  • 4. Emissions shall be monitored in all cases via measurements or through calculations achieving at least the same accuracy. Compliance with limit values shall be verified through continuous or discontinuous measurements, type approval, or any other technically sound method including verified calculation methods. In case of continuous measurements, compliance with the limit value is achieved if the validated monthly emission average does not exceed the ELV. In case of discontinuous measurements or other appropriate determination or calculation procedures, compliance with the ELVs is achieved if the mean value based on an appropriate number of measurements under representative conditions does not exceed the value of the emission standard. The inaccuracy of measurement methods may be taken into account for verification purposes.

  • 5. Monitoring of relevant polluting substances and measurements of process parameters, as well as the quality assurance of automated measuring systems and the reference measurements to calibrate those systems, shall be carried out in accordance with CEN standards. If CEN standards are not available, ISO standards, national or international standards which will ensure the provision of data of an equivalent scientific quality shall apply.

  • 6. Special provisions for combustion plants referred to in paragraph 7:

    • a) A Party may derogate from the obligation to comply with the ELVs provided for in paragraph 7 in the following cases:

      • (i) For combustion plants normally using gaseous fuel which have to resort exceptionally to the use of other fuels because of a sudden interruption in the supply of gas and for this reason would need to be equipped with a waste gas purification facility;

      • (ii) For existing combustion plants not operated more than 17,500 operating hours, starting from 1 January 2016 and ending no later than 31 December 2023.

    • b) Where a combustion plant is extended by at least 50 MWth, the ELV specified in paragraph 7 for new installations shall apply to the extensional part affected by the change. The ELV is calculated as an average weighted by the actual thermal input for both the existing and the new part of the plant;

    • c) Parties shall ensure that provisions are made for procedures relating to malfunction or breakdown of the abatement equipment;

    • d) In the case of a multi-fuel firing combustion plant involving the simultaneous use of two or more fuels, the ELV shall be determined as the weighted average of the ELVs for the individual fuels, on the basis of the thermal input delivered by each fuel.

  • 7. Combustion plants with a rated thermal input exceeding 50 MWth:6)

    Table 1 Limit values for dust emissions from combustion plants1)

    Fuel type

    Thermal input (MWth)

    ELV for dust (mg/m3)2)

    Solid fuels

    50–100

    New plants:

       

    20 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels)

       

    20 (biomass, peat)

         
       

    Existing plants:

       

    30 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels)

       

    30 (biomass, peat)

         
     

    100–300

    New plants:

       

    20 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels)

       

    20 (biomass, peat)

         
       

    Existing plants:

       

    25 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels)

       

    20 (biomass, peat)

         
     

    >300

    New plants:

       

    10 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels)

       

    20 (biomass, peat)

         
       

    Existing plants:

       

    20 (coal, lignite and other solid fuels)

       

    20 (biomass, peat)

         

    Liquid fuels

    50–100

    New plants:

       

    20